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Sessions

Interactive Workshops

All the World's a Laboratory: Inquiry-Based Learning Experiments in the First Year Seminar Research Lab
Amy Barlow (Wheaton College)

When a student from a distinguished research university praised the awesomeness of his digital humanities laboratory, I got an idea. Would it be possible to create an analogous experience for my students at our small liberal arts college? Without a budget or an active learning classroom, resources were limited. To solve the problem, I looked to the one thing that I had in abundance: First Year Seminar (FYS) library instruction sessions.

This workshop will provide an overview of Wheaton College's FYS Research Lab, a pilot program that experimented with team and inquiry-based learning, collaborative writing, and student presentation during one-shot library instruction. Attendees can expect to hear a short history of the FYS Library Component to understand the evolving pedagogy and contributions made by other librarians. I will discuss the benefits and challenges of team and inquiry-based learning, followed by specific demonstrations of how I used case studies, Google Docs, BYOD, and standardized learning assessment. Feedback from faculty and students will be shared.

During the interactive portion of the workshop, attendees will be asked to draw on their experience with one-shot instruction. Working in groups, attendees will be given the opportunity to brainstorm, thinking about how they might apply team and inquiry-based learning techniques in small ways, without overhauling their learning outcomes and assessment practices. This is an important consideration for librarians that teach as part of a team. Groups will be encouraged to share their ideas with me and the other attendees via Google Docs.

Participants will:

  • Review the design and execution of a "Research Lab" pilot program aimed at one-shot instruction for First Year Seminar.
  • Weigh the benefits and costs of inquiry-based learning and student presentation.
  • Swap and devise techniques for integrating team and inquiry-based learning in their teaching.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Backward Design: A Must-Have Library Instructional Design Strategy for Your Pedagogical and Teaching Toolbox
Sarah LeMire (Texas A&M University Libraries) and Donna Ziegenfuss (University of Utah)

This session will help participants enhance their pedagogical toolbox by demonstrating how a backward design process can be used to plan and implement library or research instruction in a variety of formats and contexts such as one-shots, online library modules, and MOOCs. The presenters will guide participants through a process of rethinking how they can craft their library instruction, and will offer tips and lessons learned from their own teaching experiences. Participants will engage with peers and have an opportunity to 'think backwards' and align instructions with goals and outcomes using a process designed at our institution.

Participants will:

  • Define what is meant by a "backward design" approach to library instructional planning in order to articulate instructional goals and the steps toward achieving them.
  • Expand their pedagogical toolbox as they experience examples of how backward design can be used to design and implement library instruction in a variety of instructional contexts in order to envision situations where they could use backward design in their own instructional efforts.
  • Reflect on their own institutional context and consider how a pedagogical framework and/or process like backward design could be applied and implemented at their own institutions to design instruction in order to improve their library's ability to align instruction with goals and outcomes of the course, the library instruction program, and the institution.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Embracing Imperfection and the Craft of "Thinking Wrong": Wabi-Sabi as an Effective A(n)esthetic in the Teaching and Learning Process
Michael Courtney (Indiana University)

Teaching is an imperfect act of inspired creativity, frequently employing a whole-brained approach that distills complex, often disorganized concepts into an overall elegant simplicity without losing the very essence of the information. As librarian-educators, making the complex accessible requires creative, effective problem solving skills. A holistic, nonlinear approach affords possibilities for the learner. In this process we charge learners with the task of rejecting, as Marty Neumeier stated in his book The Designful Company, the "standard option box" and, instead, allow "thinking wrong," empowering learners toward innovation. Engaged learning embraces imperfections and allows one to contextualize by realizing beauty in a flawed world.

Wabi-sabi is a Japanese aesthetic embodying a Zen view seeking beauty in the imperfect. It is in a constant state of flux, leaving pathways for learners to contemplate – perfect beauty caused by imperfections. Philosophically, this aesthetic recognizes the natural world free from judgment. Applying the fundamentals of this aesthetic to the teaching process allows learners to focus on the beauty of impermanence and imperfection, transcending entanglements of the complex.

This workshop will engage participants in the application of the wabi-sabi aesthetic to library instruction. Grounded in the fundamental approach to creativity inspired by the world, drawing inspiration from beauty in the ordinary, participants will engage with tools, techniques, and ideas to create wabi-sabi "art" in the classroom, embracing the serenity, joy, and surprise in critical thinking. Participants will practice using visual and interactive methods to take the elements of what learners "see" to represent the whole.

Participants will:

  • Understand the relationship of wabi-sabi aesthetic principles to student learning scenarios.
  • Identify student learning outcomes in instructional scenarios using an aesthetic approach to teaching.
  • Practice using select wabi-sabi tools and techniques in order to apply this approach to a local learning context.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Flip – Game – Assess: Taste Test for Success
Kristy Motz and Mari Kermit-Canfield (Ferris State University) and Emily Mitchell (SUNY Oswego)

Curious to sample a flipped classroom? Come experience one and learn to brew your own. Bring your curiosity and creativity, and a team of experienced flipped classroom librarians from two institutions will help you perfect the art of flipping. Get to know the ingredients (a formative assessment and more), ferment your process with a brief online tutorial, condition your brew while experiencing in-classroom activities/games, and taste test the product with a post-activity quiz to assess your learning. You can craft your own flipped classroom to perfection with our tips and our free software, which is available for customization. BYOD.

Participants will:

  • Be prepared to demonstrate two flipped classroom activities in order to create unique flipped classroom hands-on activities at their own institutions.
  • Be prepared to describe an online pretest and post-test activity in order to create a valid flipped classroom assessment measure.
  • Be prepared to design a complete flipped classroom experience using an online tutorial and active learning techniques in order to improve learning in the library classroom.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Getting Carded: Threshold Concepts in One-Shot Sessions
Meagan Christensen, Todd Burks and Meridith Wolnick (University of Virginia)

Underage thinkers want to fully participate as information literate adults. How can we welcome them into the world of research and effectively show them how to responsibly build on what they already know?

We've developed a customizable deck of cards that illustrates how information is created and quickly facilitates meaningful engagement with a wide variety of source types. This low-tech, hands-on activity has transformed our teaching and energized our students. Session participants will see the deck in action, learn how to create three easily executable lesson plans, and will be given the resources needed to create their own Source Decks.

Participants will:

  • Be able to construct their own customized Source Deck.
  • Be able to identify 3+ instructional situations where the Source Deck can be used.
  • Leave the session ready to implement 3 different activities in their personal instruction.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Instruction with Digitized Primary Source Materials: Crafting Lesson Plans to Engage Students
Laura Hibbler (Brandeis University)

Digitization efforts have made a rich array of primary source materials available online in recent years. These sources provide students with valuable opportunities to engage with archival materials and other types of primary sources that would have been inaccessible in years past, when many of these materials were available only at large research libraries or in an archive located miles away. With these digitized sources freely available online or available through a library database just a few mouse clicks away, how do we encourage students to see research as more than a process of search and retrieval? How do we help students develop the research practices that they will need for engaging with primary sources and thinking about the context in which these sources were produced?

In this interactive workshop, we will discuss the challenges involved in teaching students how to conduct research with digitized primary sources. Workshop participants will be asked to take on the role of a student researcher, navigating these digitized resources by working in small groups to complete a set of learning activities designed to help students develop the habits of mind necessary to work with primary source materials.

If participants are able to bring a laptop or tablet, they are encouraged to bring one to the session. The presenter will provide print-outs of digitized primary source materials to attendees who do not have a laptop or tablet.

Participants will:

  • Design learning activities that will enhance student engagement with digitized primary source materials.
  • Implement active learning exercises that teach students to search more effectively for digitized primary source materials.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Just Say "No": Empowering Ourselves and Our Expertise
Angela Pashia (University of West Georgia), Kevin Seeber (Colorado State University-Pueblo) and Nancy Noe (Auburn University)

Librarians often receive requests from well-intentioned faculty for sessions that are predicated upon unspecified learning objectives, poorly designed library assignments, or outdated expectations of how a library session should be conducted. So how do librarians say "No" to this sort of request while still saying "Yes"? The purpose of this workshop is to empower librarians to recognize themselves as experts in their field and provide them with strategies to say "No" in a way which will lead to positive outcomes and improved student learning of information literacy skills.

Participants will:

  • Discuss a range of strategies for saying "no" to unsound requests for library instruction.
  • Practice employing strategies for responding to poorly conceived instruction requests and additional work requests.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Mixing, Mashing, and Memeing : Engaging Students with Participatory Classroom Culture
Jennifer Ditkoff and Irene McGarrity (Keene State College)

This interactive workshop will focus on one library's classroom experience engaging students in participatory culture principles and ethical digital information creation through student centered pedagogies. Although undergraduates may be seen as technologically savvy, they grew up with the distractions of technology without examining the impact intellectually as well as socially, economically, and culturally. Using a reflective lens, students explored these ideas while producing digital content as a means of self-discovery, self-expression, and community engagement. The class mixed up fan art to understand digital identity, crafted memes to get first hand intellectual property rights experience, and mashed up content to gain knowledge of the rights and responsibilities of information creators. Additionally, the students took on a greater role in developing course content and teaching. This bottom-up pedagogical approach of allowing the students to control course content, and become the facilitator, brought new energy into the classroom. In this workshop, participants will learn how the course was developed, how the students were asked to become actively involved in creating the course content, and what the instructors learned through the process of teaching the course. Attendees and workshop facilitators will work together brainstorming workshop content, and collaboratively crafting an assignment to mimic the principles of a participatory classroom culture.

Participants will:

  • Gain concrete ideas for designing participatory culture activities including ethical information creation.
  • Be able to define parameters for creating a classroom space that allows student generated content.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Psychology as a Second Language? What Applied Linguistics Can Teach Us About Scholarship as a Conversation
Fiona Inglis and Autumn Piette (Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology)

The new Framework for Information Literacy reminds us that scholarship is a conversation. Linguists tell us that all conversations have rules, but how do new college and university students learn the rules for conversations in their discipline? Within language teaching, discourse analysis is a common pedagogical technique to help students acquire a new language. How could these teaching techniques be applied to information literacy to improve students' research and citation? This session will demonstrate how discourse analysis can help students realize that their assignments form part of an ongoing conversation, and give them the tools they need to be able to take part in that conversation. The workshop will start with a brief overview of the theoretical framework for this approach to IL instruction by looking at both the new IL framework and principals of discourse analysis. This will be followed by a series of hands-on activities and group discussions. Participants will have the opportunity to analyze a piece of academic discourse, try some classroom exercises, and even create their own materials based on the information provided in the workshop.

Participants will:

  • Evaluate discourse analysis techniques in order to apply them to their own contexts.
  • Examine academic writing for key discourse features in order to prepare effective instructional material.
  • Construct activities that will help their students join the academic conversation.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Source Code: Assessing Cited References to Measure Student Information Literacy Skills
Dale Vidmar (Southern Oregon University)

Sustainable instruction in today's environment of reduced resources must be aligned with student learning outcomes and measurements. As such, the assessment of student work is paramount to a thriving information literacy and instruction program that benefits the library, the institution, and ultimately student learning.

The key is to assess what is valued in a way that is manageable and informative. At the same time, it is important to analyze embedded assessments—that is actual student work samples required to complete specific assignments or requirements in order to provide a direct and more accurate picture of student achievement and program effectiveness.

In this workshop, after a brief introduction, attendees will work in small groups with sample references from student papers using a customized rubric to measure the quality, variety, and breadth of sources. The process concentrates on the first page and the list of references from the writing samples to determine the students' ability to find, retrieve, and use a variety of high quality information sources to support their research.

The larger conversation will be framed within the context of the following questions:

  • What do the sample references/citations say about student learning—information literacy outcomes?
  • What conclusions could we draw about the library instruction program as well as the institutional and departmental outcomes?
  • Are the samples what we expect? Can we do better? How?

Together we will ponder these questions and, perhaps, how to enhance both information literacy instruction and student achievement in a meaningful, relevant, and doable manner.

Participants will:

  • Analyze citations included in papers to determine students' ability to find and evaluate information sources.
  • Evaluate the quality of discipline appropriate and relevant sources cited to support student research.
  • Synthesize information gathered from references to draw conclusions about instructional and program effectiveness.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Video Magic: Student Filmmaking with GoPros
Margot Hanson (California Maritime Academy)

Become a GoPro filmmaker! During this hands-on workshop, you'll have the opportunity to collaborate on videos, learn about the unique appeal of GoPro cameras, and experiment with free, simple software. Learn how to initiate GoPro lending at your library, collaborate with campus partners to start a student film contest, and partner with faculty members on assignments for student video creation.

The presenter will share insights from a grant project to purchase GoPro cameras & mounts for the classroom and the library. Students created videos to illustrate information literacy concepts learned throughout the semester, reinforcing lecture material in an engaging manner.

Participants will:

  • Collaboratively develop a short script and video in order to learn about video production projects.
  • Gain knowledge about GoPro cameras and software in order to develop circulation policies and procedures.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Presentations

Bias Isn't Always Bad: Teaching Students to Evaluate and Use Information Effectively
Anthony Sigismondi (St. Norbert College)

Many undergraduates struggle with the ability to critically analyze information and use it effectively in their research. These problems stem, in no small part, from the common belief among students that the sole purpose of research is to find objective information that supports their arguments. Instructors often reinforce this limited understanding of the research process by treating the distinction between credible and unreliable sources as absolute when discussing strategies for evaluating sources. This presentation suggests that an alternative framework for teaching students to evaluate sources is needed, especially given current efforts to redefine dominant notions of information literacy. Drawing on materials that address the history of labor radicalism in the United States, it demonstrates how asking students to evaluate sources that have clear biases can help them develop a more sophisticated understanding of the research process.

Participants will:

  • Be able to design lessons based on topics or problems that foster learners' ability to more deeply and critically evaluate biases in a variety of sources.
  • Be able to anticipate challenges and opportunities for implementing these learning activities at their own institutions.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Brewing up Future Leaders: Supporting Applied Learning Initiatives on Campus
Melissa Mallon (Vanderbilt University)

As students enter a complex and intense job market, the need to equip them with the skills that make them stand out becomes more important than ever. By collaborating with faculty members in the teaching and assessment of applied learning skills in the classroom, librarians can ensure students are gaining skills in information retrieval and critical thinking that equal success in the 21st century workplace. This presentation will highlight successful applied learning collaborations in several disciplines, and share tips for identifying projects and approaching teaching faculty on your campus. Who knows, you may be teaching the world's next great brewmaster!

Participants will:

  • Analyze information literacy skills and concepts in order to identify their applicability for a variety of applied learning projects.
  • Report on applied learning initiatives on their campuses in order to determine opportunities for collaboration.
  • Discuss methods of assessing student learning in order to show the value of a librarian's involvement in applied learning projects.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Campus Crawl: Collaborations Taking Information Literacy Instruction Beyond Subject Matter and Into Student Life
Ingrid Ruffin and Anna Sandelli (University of Tennessee Knoxville)

This presentation will discuss the rationale, outcomes, practice, and impact of providing overlapping instruction and service to the wider campus and local community through non-traditional liaison roles. These partnerships allow information literacy instruction to become more than a classroom experience; it becomes an integral part of student life and success. These opportunities to connect with students in their element increases the reinforcement of information literacy skills in everyday life creating life-long information literate learners. Participant take-a-ways will include tools, ideas, and proven strategies of how to reach students beyond the library classroom.

Presented in a multimedia format, including video and participant surveys, three key questions will be answered during the presentation:

  • Why is it important that libraries reach beyond specific subject matter into offices, organizations, and residence halls as instruction venues?
  • How do we start and build strong relationships with non-traditional roles?
  • What can we do as librarians beyond finding, evaluating, and citing sources and why it is so vital that we pursue a more holistic approach to instruction and outreach/engagement?

Participants will:

  • Learn techniques for achieving buy-in for new librarian positions that focus on student success.
  • Explore marketing ideas to enhance instruction and engagement efforts.
  • Develop strategies for turning student outreach efforts into creative instruction opportuniti.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Collaborating with Integrity: Librarians, Classroom Faculty and Administrators Mix It Up with an Academic Honesty Quiz Bowl
Jennifer Farquhar (Suffolk County Community College)

We strive for academic integrity at our institutions while realizing that often students do not have the skills necessary to avoid plagiarizing. This workshop will detail an ongoing pilot project designed to teach students academic integrity policies and citation skills in 100 level composition classes. The project is a collaborative effort between librarians, classroom faculty, administrators and paraprofessionals. In the workshop I will demonstrate the quiz game I designed, explain the collaboration process, and discuss some of the pitfalls in the first semester of the project and how we are addressing them.

This presentation will engage participants through video clips, participation in a quiz show, and the opportunity to share their own collaborative efforts.

Participants will:

  • Develop techniques for implementing collaborative projects outside the library.
  • Acquire tools for creating similar quiz games at their institutions.
  • Share collaborative plans that have been successful at their institutions.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Crafting a Full-Bodied IL Program: Using CRM as a Strategic Framework to Maximize Value
Lora Leligdon (Dartmouth College), Lea Briggs and Todd Quinn (University of New Mexico)

Understanding your information literacy program's "customers" and creating value with them is paramount for a successful instruction program. A key to completing this is a systematic understanding and implementation of an IL program strategy. This presentation will outline a conceptual framework for a holistic Customer Relationship Management (CRM) that will create a process-based, whole-library strategy to build and maintain strong and lasting relationships for our IL programs. By learning about and applying CRM, libraries may not only create value for both their institutions and their users, but also may assess their performance and communicate their worth.

Based on Payne and Frow's (2005) model, this processed-based framework organizes, streamlines, and synchronizes the libraries' efforts. The framework moves from review and articulation of the library's IL program vision through identifying and targeting collaborators, managing positive interactions in all channels, collecting and using assessment data to generate insight and ensuring that the library's strategic aims are being delivered. While adopting CRM as whole organization, cross-functional strategy may require a paradigm shift for academic libraries, its positive results may help libraries navigate and improve their return on investment in these lean budget times and in a dynamic changing environment.

During the presentation, we will define what constitutes CRM in an IL instruction environment, along with its benefits, merits, and potential challenges. The majority of the presentation will be guiding the participants through each conceptual process of the framework while sharing knowledge and examples.

Participants will:

  • Identify the importance of a strategic approach to IL programs within a CRM context.
  • Develop a framework for building a systematic IL program strategy in order to enhance relationships and library's value.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Crafting a New Brew: Taking the Lead in Developing Specialized Instruction
Emily Thompson (University of Tennessee at Chattanooga), Brandon West and Michelle Bishop (SUNY Oswego)

As our profession changes to meet new needs, librarian titles and responsibilities are also evolving. Over the past 5 years, the open library positions at our university have required new librarians to use a new set of ingredients to develop new formulas unlike anything you've tasted before. A panel of three librarians will share how they were able to effectively take ownership of their newly crafted positions. Their discussions will include an examination of the evolution of their job responsibilities, sharing lessons learned and a look at the impact their positions have on library instruction in the areas of multimedia production, first year experience, and online instruction.

Participants will:

  • Attendees who are search committee members or directors will be able to identify areas of responsibility to consider in creating working job ads for similar positions in their libraries.
  • Attendees who are recent graduates or nearing graduation will gain competitive insight into skills necessary for new academic librarian positions.
  • Attendees who are new to the profession will be able to apply strategies for developing innovative instruction and other services.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Crafting Freshman Engagement: A Study of Library Orientations in the Fledgling First Year Experience Program at UC San Diego
Crystal Goldman, Amanda Heath and Lia Friedman (UC San Diego)

This presentation focuses on crafting an engaging library orientation for UC San Diego First Year Experience (FYE) courses. A freshly brewed endeavor for the UCSD campus, the FYE program partnered with librarians to introduce students to research concepts and library services. The library module included a brief in-class presentation about library resources, an online interactive library scavenger hunt given as an in-class activity, and a homework assignment where students created a public service announcement (PSA) highlighting their favorite library resource.

Each segment of the module was designed to both introduce students to and increase their comfort with the library and its resources in a fun and appealing way. Using an innovative mobile gaming platform as the scavenger hunt tool, UCSD librarians were able to elevate the traditional scavenger hunt model by using branching logic that allowed students to choose their own paths through the activity. When completed, students were able to then craft a PSA that highlighted a library resource, service, or location that was individually meaningful.

The model offered in this presentation could be easily implemented at other institutions if a strong partnership is established between the university library and the First Year Experience program—or another campus program geared toward new students. Over 400 first year students participated in the UCSD library module. Data collected in the module, along with best practices and pitfalls, will be shared during this presentation.

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify potential partnerships between campus programs (e.g. First Year Experience) and the library.
  • Be able to begin the design process for a similar library orientation module on their campus.
  • Be able to recognize potential problems in the library orientation design process.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Crafting Peak Performance with Student Athletes
Lisa Burgert (University of San Diego)

College athletic programs are making headlines -paper courses, grade scandals, and student's abysmal reading skills. Student athletes have a record of problems with low attendance, poor academic performance, appalling writing skills, and a high failure rate.

At the University of San Diego, the Athletics' Academic Director desired student athletes to be successful in their courses and more importantly for freshman to develop research skills necessary to succeed throughout their coursework. The university library has a similar goal for all students to be information literate. A complete revision of a 3-unit credit Library 101 course created an environment which successfully met the needs of everyone involved.

The course redesign included building the course in Blackboard, using an open-access textbook, incorporating streaming media, and in-class activities that allowed students to practice research skills. Additionally, the course incorporated the campus-wide read and integrated extra-curricular activities.

LIBR 101 has not only been successful with Men's Basketball and Football, but also veterans. By starting with open lines of communication with athletics, learning their goals and objectives, and understanding challenges student athlete's face, it is possible to create a high impact course which benefits student athletes and all students.

This session will review the challenges student athletes face on a daily basis and effective ways to engage all students in the classroom. Participants will evaluate scenarios athletes face and respond using an audience response system. Walk away with a better understanding of student athletes and practical pedagogical strategies to incorporate into library sessions.

Participants will:

  • Recognize effective outreach strategies to build relationships with stakeholders in athletic departments in order to increase student athlete's participation and success in library courses/workshops.
  • Differentiate between typical students and student athlete's obstacles in order to understand the challenges unique to college athletes and the essential role of their academic advisors.
  • Analyze high impact practices in order to incorporate these practices resulting in an increase student athlete's campus engagement.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Developing a Taste for Scholarly Communication: Teaching "Scholarship is a Conversation" Through Poster Sessions
Silvia Vong (University of St. Michael's College, University of Toronto) and Vincci Lui (University of Toronto)

Explore how a library-run research poster forum, in conjunction with multidisciplinary poster presentation workshops, can help to impart some key threshold concepts: scholarship is a conversation, research as inquiry, and format as process. This session will discuss the impact of the workshops and poster session event through data collected from a pre-test and post-test with undergraduate students who participated in a poster session competition.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the pedagogical value of academic posters in information literacy instruction.
  • Learn how to reinforce information literacy threshold concepts by connecting them with the experiences of posters and undergraduate conferences.
  • Learn how to strengthen the role of librarians in educating undergraduate students on academic research culture and/or scholarly communication.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Distributing Your Craft: Scaling Quality Instruction
Theresa Westbrock and Felipe Castillo (New Mexico State University)

The traditional one-shot instruction format is limited by practical factors such as time, existing curriculum, and students' varying background knowledge. In order to provide higher levels of instruction, we developed two models for improving the quality of face-to-face instruction, both scalable to large numbers of students. The first strategy incorporates a flipped classroom model, based on the results of a multi-semester research project in collaboration with the First Year Writing Program (FYWP) that looked at students' writing and research processes.

We created a set of ten modules, called Research Diaries, to embed parts of the research process into the course learning management system, Canvas. This process allows librarians to focus on higher-order research concepts during the face-to-face library instruction session because students have already started the research conversation. The second strategy leverages interactive tutorials in order to save class time for covering higher-order concepts. Due to limited class time, we developed several interactive tutorials using Adobe Captivate to guide students through the steps of searching specialized databases. More class time is now devoted to discussing business concepts, such as market segmentation and financial ratios. Implementing these changes to our traditional instruction setting has enabled us to scale meaningful instruction interactions. We have made great strides toward improving the quality and meaning of the students' interaction with the library and the research process.

Participants will:

  • Be able to adapt the Research Diary modules and the interactive business tutorials in order to develop strategies for scaling successful instruction to meet their home institution's needs.
  • Be able to design a plan for developing instructional tools in order for students to have more time in face-to-face library instruction sessions to synthesize higher order information literacy concepts.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic

Does It Really Take 50 Minutes? Insights from Faculty Focus Groups on Delivering Library Instruction in a General Education Program
Jackie Sipes (Temple University)

As instructors, how do we ensure that we're making the best use of class time? Is a full 50 minutes of in-person instruction always the best format? How do we decide that an online guide can replace an in-class activity? Grappling with increased demands on time and the need to scale instruction across a large number of General Education courses the presenter, a librarian at a large research university, faced these questions head on. To gain insight, the librarian conducted a focus group with faculty in the hopes of identifying which learning outcomes were best suited to in-person, interactive instruction sessions and which could potentially be abbreviated or offloaded to an online format. In the sessions, the librarian presented faculty with 10 questions on their impressions of previous library workshops, student success, and other formats for instruction. The librarian came away with ideas for alternatives to the 50 minute session and strengthened collaborative relationships with the focus group attendees. Focus groups are a powerful assessment tool that generate rich discussion that may be missed through surveys or one-on-one interviews. The librarian's process of coordinating and planning the focus group, as well its outcomes, will be detailed in this session.

Participants will:

  • Learn how to conduct their own feedback sessions or focus groups with faculty.
  • Learn how to translate feedback into actionable changes to the current instructional model.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic

Do You Come Here Often? Using Student Course Registration Data to Improve Your Teaching, Outreach, and Information Literacy Program
Erica Schattle (Tufts University)

Do you suspect that you are seeing the same students over and over again in your information literacy instruction while other students slip through the cracks? While programs often track numbers of attendees in instruction sessions, these counts only tell part of the story. Collaborating with campus partners can help you learn how your instruction program reaches individual students by combining course registration data with information literacy instruction data. Learn how to acquire and use this information to improve your teaching, outreach, and information literacy program.

Participants will:

  • Describe how information from course registration data be combined with information literacy instruction data in order to improve teaching and information literacy programs.
  • Generate questions about their information literacy program that could be answered through course registration data in order to initiate collaboration with campus partners.
  • Explore strategies for communicating instructional reach in order to strengthen outreach with academic departments and programs.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Drinking on the Job: Integrating Workplace Information Literacy into the Curriculum
Alison Hicks (University of Colorado, Boulder)

This session will introduce the concept of workplace information literacy as well as how one librarian has successfully started to prepare students for information contexts that go beyond traditional academic structures. Drawing on interviews with professionals who engage in information seeking practices (eg teachers and journalists), this session will demonstrate how a focus on the multimodal and situated nature of information landscapes can help students manage their own learning for the workplace. It will also provide an opportunity for attendees to reflect on workplace practice in their own field and how to integrate these concepts into instruction opportunities.

Participants will:

  • Analyze the definitions and concepts that inform one's understanding and construction of workplace information literacy.
  • Recognize the processes that support learning in a human-networked world.
  • Identify how these processes might be applied in different content areas and contexts for learning.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Educational Innovation: Developing Quality Online Instruction
Brianne Markowski (University of Northern Colorado), Sarah McDaniel and Sheila Stoeckel (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Inspired by a campus initiative to enhance learning and increase capacity, the University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries participated in an early pilot to develop an online, general education speech course with a substantial, embedded information literacy unit. In this session, we'll introduce a research-based course design process focused around the Quality Matters rubric that you can use to 1) facilitate discussions with faculty and stakeholders around online offerings and 2) translate robust research activities into the online course environment. We'll also share our experiences collaborating fully with faculty and instructional designers on every phase of design and implementation.

Participants will:

  • Use the Quality Matters framework to forge a common language for discussing online offerings with faculty and stakeholders.
  • Use backward design to align course objectives, assessments, instructional materials, and activities.
  • Describe goals for partnering with other stakeholders in support of campus-level instructional initiatives related to capacity and online learning.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Elevating Source Evaluation: Teaching and Un-teaching Authority in the Critical Library Classroom
Eamon Tewell and Kate Angell (Long Island University, Brooklyn)

Encouraged by the possibilities in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy, two librarians at Long Island University identified an opportunity to elevate the standard approach to source evaluation and take the less-traveled path of recognizing students' own authority in the library classroom. Inspired by the field of critical pedagogy and emboldened by the Framework's statement that "Authority is Contextual and Constructed," new ways to empower learners and discuss authority's role in evaluating resources were devised.

By discussing information sources students are likely to use, asking students in an intentional way what they want to learn about, and prompting reflection on a source of their choosing, the instructors ignited personal interest and the critical evaluation of sources. After seeing these examples of bringing the authority of resources into question, participants will break into pairs and start on their own approach to teaching source evaluation. Find out what happened when learners reflected on the authority of information sources and took charge of class content, and discover the implications for your own instruction.

Participants will:

  • Consider how one's own authority is presented in classes in order to be more fully aware of the classroom's power dynamics.
  • Describe one to two strategies for teaching the construction of authority in order to discuss the complexities of information evaluation with your classes.
  • Design a new activity or approach to teaching source evaluation in order to apply to your own instruction.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Extending Research Conversations: A Model for Integrated Research Instruction
Bill Gillis, Mary Buckley and Kathy Larsen (George Washington University)

How can we talk with students in ways that move beyond thinking about research as merely a set of skills, the ability to seek and find? Where do odd-angled questions lead, and how do we extend research conversations by encouraging students to see outside sources not as barriers to creativity, but as the foundation for it? Hear how an instruction librarian and two teaching faculty integrate research instruction in two short term study abroad WID courses by hosting formal research salons and through unstructured on-the-fly discussions, and think about how you can adapt this innovative model at your own institutions.

Participants will:

  • Explore new vocabularies for engaging students in conversations about research and writing.
  • Consider ways they can adapt this pedagogical approach for use at their home institutions - as a model for instruction as well as outreach to teaching faculty.
  • Discover how creative thinking and appropriate risk-taking can lead to exciting opportunities for pedagogical innovation and cross-campus collaboration focused on student research success.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Facilitating Peer Learning in the Library: Crafting the Perfect Batch of Undergraduate Peer Research Mentors
Clinton Baugess and Mallory Jallas (Gettysburg College)

Librarians at a college library developed a Peer Research Mentor (PRM) program for undergraduate students in order to facilitate peer learning and expand the library's formal instruction program beyond the traditional reach of the library and librarians. The presenters will discuss recruiting the initial cohort of eight PRMs, strengthening PRMs' research skills through an intensive training curriculum, and an overview of the various instructional outreach projects that have been designed and implemented by PRMs for other students. The presentation will discuss program assessment methods, share findings from the current cohort, and outline plans for the program's development.

Participants will:

  • Understand how to develop, train, and sustain a cohort of student peer research mentors in order to deliver high-impact peer-to-peer learning opportunities.
  • Identify a range of possible student-developed and delivered instructional outreach programs in order to facilitate peer learning.
  • Discuss the value of peer learning programs in academic libraries in order to expand the reach of traditional information literacy instruction programs.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Fermentation, Not Deterioration: How an Instruction Program had to Fail Before It Could Find Its Way
Christina Heady (Southern Illinois University)

After working collaboratively on an exhaustive and elaborate assessment plan that collapsed as a result of outside forces, a group of instruction librarians at a mid-sized Midwestern university had to re-evaluate their entire program. The failure of the assessment effort was a blessing in disguise, because with nothing left to lose, new approaches came to light that promise to both prevent future catastrophes and better serve their students.

Participants will:

  • Analyze four responses to programmatic collapse in order to come up with sustainable solutions.
  • Collaborate in order to create additional alternative solutions that have not been discussed.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

From Pints to Barrels: Helping Topic-Focused Students See the Bigger Picture
Beth Fuchs and Deborah Sharp (University of Kentucky)

Research projects have the potential to engage undergraduates in an understanding of the complexity of knowledge, but what stymies many students as they attempt to frame their research, according to Project Information Literacy's inaugural report in 2009, is an understanding of the larger context of their topics. What teaching techniques can we use to help students understand that database results don't have to be exclusively on their topics to be useful? Using cognitive science and assessment results to inform our methods, we'll share active learning activities that can assist students in gaining insight into the broader landscapes of their topics.

Participants will:

  • Apply a locally-developed rubric in order to broaden a narrowly defined research topic.
  • Analyze the relationship between published research and local assessment data in order to create more effective context-based active learning activities.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Graphic Design for Maximum Engagement
Meggan Frost (Paul Smith's College)

The future is a visual place. The media is dominated by image-based sharing. Carefully designed ads and brands are constantly bombarding us. Such a visually stimulated world raises important questions about visual literacy but it also asks questions about how libraries are communicating without words. What do our materials and use of images say about us? How are we engaging our communities with intentional graphic design?

This session will begin with basic graphic design principles and apply them to various print and electronic materials with the purpose of effectively communicating messages and engaging with communities. Emphasis will be placed on the practical considerations of the design process, software choices, where to find useful materials for including in designs, and places to be inspired. Attendees will leave with many free resource suggestions and an understanding of how to use design principles to create all kinds of materials from handouts and event posters to infographics and syllabi.

Participants will:

  • Be able to define the principles of good design in order to apply them to print and electronic materials.
  • Examine different resources in terms of usefulness in order to create engaging print and electronic materials.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Hacking the Framework: Using the Art and Science of Story to Address the Dispositions
John Watts (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) and Joshua Vossler (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale)

Librarians are tasked with teaching ever more elaborate information literacy concepts and skills to students who may doubt its value. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that stories can affect attitudes and even prime the brain for learning. In this presentation, we will discuss empirical research on the neuroscience of storytelling, its implications for information literacy instruction, and share an approach for converting an anecdote into a powerful instructional tool.

Participants will:

  • Connect a story with one or more dispositions in order to incorporate the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education into their teaching practice.
  • Apply fundamental story structures to personal anecdotes in order to produce an instructional story.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

High Gravity, Unfiltered Advice: Teachers-turned-Librarians Share Tips for Improving Instruction
Lindy Scripps-Hoekstra (Grand Valley State University), Brandon West (SUNY Oswego) and Daniel Zuberbier (East Carolina University)

With degrees in education and over 14,500 hours of K-12 instruction under their belts, these three teachers-turned-librarians have seen just about everything! This session will provide practical instructional tips gleaned from years of classroom experience and equip participants with concrete solutions to common instructional problems and ideas for improving their own teaching.

Presenters will focus on strategies for classroom management, instructional design, and teaching presence. Attendees will identify an area of their instruction that needs improvement, collaborate with others who share the same concern, and work to map out solutions.

Participants will:

  • Identify practical strategies for improving their instruction based on the advice of seasoned educators.
  • Create a plan for implementing new teaching tips and strategies to address an instructional need.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Learning Concepts Assessment: What Do They Remember?
Meg Frazier and Megan Jaskowiak (Bradley University)

Assessment is everywhere in libraries, and it can be overwhelming to think about all the questions that could be asked: what needs to be assessed, how do we do it, what to do with the information collected. One way to cope with the anxiety is just to pick something to assess and start. This session will showcase how we moved from just collecting assessment information that went into a desk drawer to a more meaningful analysis. It will cover two different learning concepts assessments and analyses of both qualitative and quantitative data.

Participants will:

  • Compare two qualitative assessment tools.
  • Identify methods of analysis of data.
  • Inspire the implementation of assessment of library instruction.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Learning to Teach, Teaching to Learn: A Cognitive Apprenticeship Model to Train Instruction Librarians
Caitlin MacKenzie Mannion and Nicole E. Brown (New York University)

How do you train new librarians to think like a teacher? This interactive presentation introduces the cognitive apprenticeship, an efficient and salient training model that pairs a mentee with an experienced mentor. Based on an actual cognitive apprenticeship between the authors, this presentation will give attendees the opportunity to explore how similar models may be applied to different contexts, such as on-the-job training for new instruction librarians.

Participants will:

  • Identify the components of a cognitive apprenticeship in order to develop instructional training materials.
  • Apply the structure and philosophy of a cognitive apprenticeship in order to design instructional training programs.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Librarians a'Mingling! Developing University Partnerships, Creating Local Community, and Embedding IL/Research Skills Development for International Students
Darby L. Fanning (University of Utah)

The J. Willard Marriott Library at the University of Utah has developed a unique approach to addressing the academic, linguistic and cultural preparedness, and community integration for international students who study at both the home campus in Salt Lake City and the Asia Campus in Incheon, Republic of Korea. Through the establishment of the International College & Interdisciplinary (INTER CIT) Team at the Marriott Library, librarians and library staff have devised creative strategies to approach non-academic units with non-traditional collaborative opportunities that enrich the academic experience for international students, as well as transforming the traditional role of the library as educator in the space of ESL/EAP/EAS, both locally and globally. The major outcome from these partnerships, outreach, and teaching endeavors has been that the INTER CIT has developed strong strategic partnerships with academic and non-academic units on campus in order to develop a centralized network of continually increased support for English language learners. These partnerships with non-academic units, specifically under the umbrella of the Office for Global Engagement, have provided an opportunity for the library to orient students to a western university system, one which is research intensive, and provide a solid foundation for a supportive academic and social community. Additionally, the close partnership of the library with academic units—specifically the ESL Program--further strengthens the library's relationship with students and faculty through provision of course-integrated research skills development curriculum, one which uses second–language acquisition (L2) pedagogy and focuses on both language and content.

Participants will:

  • Describe the library's development of a formal role in support and education for international students.
  • Compare/contrast international student needs from domestic students in order to inform local needs assessment.
  • Construct an approach for the library's space at other institutions.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Librarians as Action Researchers: A Practical Framework for Evidence-Based Information Literacy Instruction
Kevin Michael Klipfel (California State University-Chico) and Alexander J. Carroll (University of Maryland)

This presentation proposes a framework for evidence-based practice for instructional librarianship drawn from discourse in education regarding the role of evidence in professional practice. We propose a framework for librarians to conceive of themselves as "action researchers": professional practitioners who (1) adhere to the best available evidence about teaching and learning; (2) methodologically test their assumptions about their practice by conducting research in their local environments; and (3) apply these learnings in their own research and instruction practices. This definition differs from the current library literature on evidence-based practice in two main ways: it provides librarians with an established theoretical framework for becoming evidence-based instructors in practice and it elevates data about student learning, rather than professional intuition or faculty perceptions, as the driving force behind our decision making as teacher-librarians.

We will next discuss the major practical benefits of this framework. First, it offers librarians a practical model that can be used to professionalize their teaching. Second, this increased professionalization as educators can help librarians more successfully meet the institutional priorities of higher education, the facilitation and assessment of student learning on campus. Lastly, by seriously engaging with the craft of teaching, teacher-librarians are better equipped to become genuine co-collaborators with faculty across campus.

The implications of this shift in professional ethos may be considerable; such paradigm shifts do not often occur within a community of practice quickly or without some resistance. Consequently, we will conclude our talk by noting potential challenges and offering concrete recommendations for success for instruction librarians and library leaders seeking to foster an evidence-based community of practice in their own libraries.

Participants will:

  • Be able to develop and apply an action-research framework in their own work as instruction librarians to become evidence-based practitioners.
  • Be able to engage in reasoned and constructive discourse with their colleagues about the potential benefits and challenges of implementing rigorous evidence-based practice in their own libraries.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Moving from Novice to Expert Teacher: Turning Your Craft Into Art
Anthony Stamatoplos (University of South Florida St. Petersburg)

The term craft normally refers to skills that one learns and fine-tunes over time through practice. In framing teaching as craft, we naturally focus on skills and practices, and consider how we develop and apply them. But good teaching consists of more than practicing skills—it is an art. Expertise and art become intertwined. This session will examine what expert teacher means in the context of academic librarianship, and explore how librarian-teachers develop their expertise. It will address obstacles and opportunities librarians face in progressing from novice to expert in their teaching. Further, it will explore challenges and benefits of transforming a craft of teaching into an art of teaching, and of embracing a professional teacher identity. Two models from outside our profession, one of skill acquisition, and the other of teaching-as-art, will frame the discussion. This framework will guide participants as they explore the concept of expert teacher and consider strategies for transforming their own practice into more meaningful and fulfilling teaching—teaching as an art.

Participants will:

  • Explain the skills acquisition model and relate it to librarians' teaching.
  • Define and explain the stages on the continuum of novice to expert, in the context of teaching skills.
  • Contrast craft and art in teaching, and explain the art-craft model's usefulness to librarians.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Problem-Based Learning: Perfecting the Recipe
Tatiana Pashkova-Balkenhol, Katherine Stewart and Melissa Gold (Millersville University)

This session will provide an opportunity for audience members to collaboratively engage with the following tasks: 1) identify essential learning outcomes for one-shot IL instruction for first year seminars, 2) modify a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) activity in current use to improve student engagement and performance, and 3) brainstorm alternative PBL activities to achieve identified outcomes.

Participants will:

  • Critically examine learning outcomes for one-shot information literacy sessions in first year seminar courses from the perspectives of key university stakeholders
  • Identify 3 critical learning outcomes for one-shot library sessions that can be implemented in a wide range of first year courses.
  • Take away ideas and PBL activities for implementing successful information literacy sessions in first year seminars.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Reconsidering Threshold Concepts: A Critical Appraisal of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy
Lane Wilkinson (University of Tennessee at Chattanooga)

At the core of the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy is the educational theory of threshold concepts, according to which every discipline contains "troublesome" concepts that stand as barriers to learning. Accordingly, by identifying these barriers and directing our teaching towards them, educators can foster deeper understanding and appreciation of complex subjects. In light of the new ACRL Framework's adoption of threshold concepts, this presentation from a former member of the Framework Task Force will offer a critical assessment of the applicability of threshold concepts to information literacy.

This presentation will argue that the six "frames" of information literacy are underdetermined, they fail to distinguish concepts from skills, they are too relative to individual student experiences to provide general guidance, and they reduce information literacy to a single discipline. This last point is especially important insofar as the new Framework removes our ability to think of information literacy as a general, interdisciplinary set of critical thinking skills.

Ultimately, through its insistence on threshold concepts as first principles, the new ACRL Framework moves away from its promise of holism and instead becomes inward-looking and exclusionary. Thankfully, the Framework is malleable enough that with a few modifications to threshold concept theory, an increased sensitivity to student learning differences, and close attention to the cross-disciplinary relevance of information literacy, there is something to salvage. Rather than accept the ACRL Framework uncritically, we owe it to ourselves and our students to ask tough questions.

Participants will:

  • Be able to articulate the pedagogical and philosophical implications of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy.
  • Understand the key points of the debate over threshold concepts.
  • Be able to articulate situate their own experiences as instructors within the ACRL Framework.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle? An Analysis of Practices Related to the Sharing of Information Literacy Instruction Materials Amongst Academic Librarians
Ryne Leuzinger (Cal State Monterey Bay)

This session will detail the results from a study that evaluated how academic librarians share instructional materials such as tutorials and lesson plans with fellow practitioners. The findings described will include the degree to which librarians share these materials within their institutions as well as with colleagues outside of their institutions. The session will also identify specific methods used for sharing instructional materials, including formalized processes (institutional repositories, peer-reviewed online repositories like PRIMO) as well as informal processes (listservs, Google Drive). Data will be shared from surveys and interviews that describe the types of teaching materials that are being shared and what respondents believe the benefits of sharing are. Additionally, there will be a discussion of obstacles that inhibit sharing.

Research in other areas of education has identified numerous benefits associated with sharing instructional materials such as streamlining workflows by eliminating redundant content creation. This session will evaluate how these benefits relate to academic librarianship and in turn how the most effective sharing practices can be best supported.

Participants will:

  • Critically consider trends in the sharing of information literacy instruction materials in order to gain a stronger understanding of the ways in which the materials that they create could assist fellow practitioners.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Splitting the Tab: Integrating High School and College Outreach and Retention Efforts
Juliann Couture, Caroline Sinkinson and Vicki Gruzynski (University of Colorado Boulder)

Educational institutions are committed to advancing students' college readiness and supporting students' transition from high school to college, especially in light of current retention trends. A group of academic librarians constructed a multifaceted approach to support local retention and diversity initiatives. Learn about their pilot workshop for students, librarians, and teachers across educational levels and hear how they strove to highlight underrepresented student perspectives. Come share your ideas on how to engage different stakeholders in these initiatives and brainstorm ways to integrate outreach and retention efforts at the local level.

Participants will:

  • Recognize limitations, roadblocks, and successes of previous models of high school to college outreach initiatives.
  • Recognize methods for identifying strategic campus and community partners in order to leverage expertise, buy-in, and efficiency.
  • Determine and adapt components of a pilot project designed to serve student success and retention to match local contexts.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Stocking the Bar: Meeting the Challenge of Information Literacy Ale-ments
Maoria J. Kirker (George Mason University)

Do institutional budget cuts have you missing out on professional development opportunities? Grab a bar stool and learn how to stock your instructional bar to maximize internally driven professional development. Attendees will learn how a university library system crafted, brewed, and conditioned a reading roundtable, teaching workshop, and virtual instructor's toolkit to propel teaching librarians and staff forward even if your budget has stagnated.

Participants will:

  • Reflect upon the instructional skills and techniques most valued at your institution in order to implement professional development activities that reinforce and build upon these skills.
  • Design internal professional development activities and tools in order to sustain and develop instructional skills amongst teaching librarians and staff.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Tapping into the First Year Experience: Effective Learning with Augmented Reality and Pop Culture
Jovanni Lota, Treva Shawn Anderson and Bethany Tschaepe (University of Houston-Downtown)

Using a free mobile application that allows creators to deliver instructional content through augmented reality, University of Houston-Downtown librarians designed and implemented an engaging new library instruction activity. This program was implemented in Fall of 2014 for all First Year Students, but since its initial inception over two years ago, it has been a challenge to balance the implementation of innovative technology while maintaining the quality of effective library instruction. Join us as we take participants through the obstacles of executing augmented reality, assessing its effectiveness, and ways in which we tweaked the recipe when the going got tough.

Participants will:

  • Be able to define Augmented Reality and identify methods to create an Augmented Reality program.
  • Be able to identify methods to increase user engagement when employing new technologies.
  • Be able to critique and/or reevaluate an implemented program to improve long-term sustainability.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Tastes Great, Less Filling: How to Design and Deliver Substantial Instruction to Large Enrollment Classes Without Being Overwhelmed
Stephanie JH McReynolds and Hyerin Bak (Syracuse University)

Of the many instructional situations faced by academic librarians, one shot sessions with large enrollment classes can often be the most problematic. Given the scalability issues and unfriendly classroom configurations inherent in such situations, incorporating active learning or assessment opportunities can seem like impossible tasks but, both can be accomplished with careful planning and execution! This presentation will outline an approach used to meet the information literacy instructional needs of a large-enrollment multi-section undergraduate business course. Topics covered will include the instructional design, delivery, and assessment strategies employed as well as the assessment results and lessons learned.

Participants will:

  • Discuss the typical attributes of a large-enrollment undergraduate class in order to identify the challenges and opportunities they present in terms of library instruction.
  • Identify the strengths and weaknesses of the outlined strategies in order to adapt and incorporate them into their teaching in meaningful ways.
  • Analyze the formative assessment results presented and generate recommendations for future instructional iterations in order to develop this ability for use in their own practice.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Taste Testing Research Topics: Assessing the Scope and Feasibility of First-Year Students' Research Paper Topics
Erin Rinto, Ariel Santos and Melissa Bowles-Terry (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

The most crucial, and often most difficult, step in creating a successful and fulfilling research project is selecting a topic. This session will highlight the challenges first-time researchers face in research topic selection as we discuss the results of a mixed-method study to discover which topics are trending and how well-developed student topics are. In our presentation, we will share the process of developing and implementing an assessment tool along with the results of our analysis, including the aspects of topic development that most challenged students, as well as where they were most successful. We will also examine the top-trending topics that our first-year composition students selected, and explore how this impacts library instruction. Our session will conclude with an overview of the changes we made to our library instruction program based on our assessment of research topics, and highlight the implications of this study for librarians and composition instructors who work with first-year students on topic selection and development.

Participants will:

  • Recognize the challenges that undergraduate students or first-time researchers face when selecting a topic for a research-based argument essay.
  • Conceptualize a process for evaluating student research topics using both quantitative and qualitative methods.
  • Use the process of evidence-based decision making to revise information literacy lessons and activities that target the process of choosing and developing a research topic.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic

Teaching Evaluation Can Be a One Dish Meal
Heather Campbell (Brescia University College)

Assessment programs often measure whether our students are learning, but how do we determine the effectiveness of our teaching? And do we have time to implement this type of assessment while balancing our other responsibilities? This session will introduce participants to a flexible model of teacher assessment that simultaneously serves broader program goals. Learn how conducting a 360 degree-style teaching evaluation can help you to build camaraderie between library colleagues, assist with faculty outreach, and measure students' learning – all at the same time. The added bonus: we become better teachers in the process! Participants of this session will be given the opportunity to use evaluation tools as well as discuss how to customize this model to their library's context.

Participants will:

  • Identify the benefits of implementing a 360-style teaching review process in their information literacy or assessment program.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Teaching Students the "How" and "Why" of Source Evaluation: Pedagogies That Empower Communities of Learning and Scholarship
Juliet Rumble, Toni Carter and Nancy Noe (Auburn University)

Evaluating sources is an essential part of the research process, but, regrettably, many undergraduates fail to grasp its importance. In their written assignments, students frequently deploy sources in an ad hoc manner or, even worse, write their papers and then look for sources. Using the new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education as a backdrop, the presenters will share strategies and classroom activities that they developed to promote students' critical engagement with information sources. These activities push students to consider the contexts in which different types of sources are created and used in order to stimulate students' critical thinking in relation to information need and the appropriateness of sources to address these needs. Throughout this interactive session, audience members will be asked to participate in selected elements of these classroom activities.

Participants will:

  • Be able to recast the traditional "popular vs. scholarly sources" library session in order to stimulate students' critical engagement with information sources.
  • Be able to use the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education to develop library sessions focused on "authority is constructed and contextual" and "information creation as a process" in order to create opportunities for students to explore the information ecosystem in which sources are evaluated.
  • Be able to develop active learning exercises that focus on the contexts in which information is created and used in order to help students recognize that information can be used to accomplish specific purposes.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Think Like a Researcher! A Library/Faculty Collaboration to Improve Student Success
Susan Mikkelsen and Matt Moberly (University of California, Merced)

We all know that first-year college students struggle with research. In particular, students have difficulty with higher-order concepts such as the iterative nature of research, evaluating sources, refining topics, and synthesizing information. The typical one-shot library session simply doesn't allow time for librarians to cover these concepts in appropriate depth. Discover how librarians and writing faculty collaborated on a curricular redesign of the freshman composition course to address this problem. Using scalable flipped classroom activities focused on information literacy threshold concepts, students are being prepared to "Think Like Researchers" BEFORE coming to the library for in-person instruction. Session attendees will be provided access to lesson plans, handouts, and examples of flipped classroom activities covering topics such as "How to Read a Scholarly Article," "Avoiding Researcher Bias," and "Developing Successful Research Topics/Questions."

Participants will:

  • Be able to develop strategies for collaborating with campus partners in order to more fully integrate information literacy into the curriculum.
  • Be able to construct specific assignments and implement instructional pedagogies that will help them to extend information literacy instruction beyond the traditional one-shot instruction session.
  • Be able to recognize and address the challenges inherent in course redesign and collaboration.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Three Classes On Tap: Brewing Library Instruction Through Collaboration
Ashley Dupuy and Chris Sharpe (Kennesaw State University) and Eli Arnold (Oglethorpe University)

Using group collaboration and team assignments, our library went through a process of trial and error to standardize library instruction curriculum for undergraduate one-shot classes. We organized a process where librarians joined together in large (and later smaller) groups to review and decide on standards, develop outcomes, and find or create sample lessons for instruction sessions. In doing so, we moved from a disorganized system to a standard curriculum based on ACRL standards with mutually-determined learning objectives and three pre-defined class types (20-minute introduction to library services, 50-minute introduction to research, and 50-minute subject or resource specific classes). In the process we developed an "instruction tool kit" to share information, and workshops to train all instruction librarians. In this presentation, we will walk participants through our process and experience and encourage them to explore new ways of approaching instruction programs at their home institutions.

http://libguides.kennesaw.edu/toolkit

Participants will:

  • Be able to collaboratively design or refresh their instruction curriculum using the tools and strategies provided in the presentation.
  • Be able to build an "instruction tool kit" to use at their home institutions.
  • Explore how to achieve a balance between standardization of instruction objectives and individual librarians' teaching styles and methods.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic

To Google This, Turn to Page 42: Building a "Choose Your Own Research Adventure" Game
Jessica Long and Jennifer Hicks (Miami University Middletown)

How do you create an interactive method for teaching students how to conduct research? Our answer, build a game. We developed an online "Choose Your Own Research Adventure" game to help students experience both the positive and negative outcomes of their research choices. The game breaks down multiple steps of the research process to show students where each path, right or wrong, can lead them. Since its inception, our online game has gone through varying stages of development, but the ultimate goal has been to create a source that helps students remember how to successfully complete research and use it in future projects. From storyboards to websites to screencasts, this presentation will cover the process of creating an interactive research game that can be utilized by all types of learners, including auditory, visual, and tactile.

Participants will:

  • Learn about the production of an online research adventure game and how it can be used in information literacy sessions.
  • Have the opportunity to see the finished game.
  • Be provided with tips on how to build their own research adventure.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Transforming the One-Shot: Incorporating Discovery Layers, Active Learning and the Framework into IL
Beth Twomey (North Dakota State University)

Discovery layers, while promising to be a one-stop-shop, also present challenges for the user in determining the format of content. This presentation will cover how the adoption of a new discovery layer has inspired North Dakota State librarians to make profound changes to their pedagogical methods in one-shot instruction sessions. Grounded in the new Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education and aided by a radically new curriculum in the First year Writing Program, a multifaceted active learning session and a formative assessment has been introduced to help students identify and assess format in the discovery environment.

Participants will:

  • Integrate discovery layers and active learning techniques into one-shot instruction sessions.
  • Select, utilize, and assess concepts from the new Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education in one-shot instruction.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Tweaking Your Pre/Post Test: Capturing Student Learning at the Session Level
Matthew Pierce (Germanna Community College)

During Fall 2014, as part of a pilot library instruction assessment project, a brief pre/post-test was administered in selected ENG 111 courses receiving "one-shot" library instruction at Germanna Community College. Initial review of the assessment data indicated that far more students answered the pre-test questions correctly than anticipated, particularly the multiple choice questions. The multiple choice questions in the assessment were modified mid-semester.

The revised questions corresponded to the same learning outcomes covered in the original iteration of the assessment instrument, but took into consideration best practices related to the construction of multiple-choice tests, including the creation of plausible distractors, and careful consideration of the vocabulary used in the test questions. When the revised assessment instrument was administered, the percentage of students answering the pre-test questions correctly was dramatically reduced, resulting in a more accurate representation of student learning in the post-test.

Lessons learned relate to the various considerations required to create valid multiple choice questions and the importance of employing multiple methods of assessment to arrive at an accurate picture of student learning. Additionally, the experience calls into question the value of administering brief quizzes (as opposed to pre/post tests) to assess student learning in the context of one-shot library instruction.

Participants will:

  • Be able to construct effective pre/post tests to measure student learning outcomes at the session level.
  • Be able to summarize the benefits of employing multiple assessment approaches when measuring student learning.
  • Be able to describe the relative merits of pre/post tests, compared with quizzes, in capturing student learning at the session level.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Two Information Literacy Threshold Concepts Walk into a Bar: Using Satirical News Sources to Promote Active Learning and Student Engagement
Stephanie Alexander (California State University East Bay)

This interactive presentation will focus on selecting active-learning strategies to successfully incorporate humorous video clips from The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, and Last Week Tonight with John Oliver into lesson plans covering information literacy threshold concepts. The audience will be introduced to several active learning strategies for incorporating videos in the classroom. Clips from the satirical news programs will be shown that relate to one or more of the six frames of information literacy outlined in ACRL's new Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education. Audience members will participate in identifying the most relevant learning strategies and frames for each video. Attendees will leave with ideas on how to engage students with information literacy threshold concepts through the creative use of satirical news clips.

Participants will:

  • Be able to evaluate various active learning strategies designed to engage students with video content.
  • Be able to construct a lesson plan that incorporates an active learning strategy designed to engage students with video content.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic

Underage Thinking: Building Tomorrow's Researchers through New Campus Collaborations
Rebecca K. Miller, Carolyn Meier and Kyrille Goldbeck DeBose (Virginia Tech)

The Advanced Research Skills Certificate program was developed as a solution for managing the growing demand for library support for students involved in undergraduate research at a large research university. This presentation will describe how this program also offered librarians a way to navigate major organizational changes within the library by creating new collaboration opportunities. Together, information literacy librarians, data librarians, and the on-campus Office of Undergraduate Research built and assessed a six-week long, extracurricular program with the goal of introducing undergraduate students to the tools, skills, and mindsets necessary for meaningfully engaging with information literacy and the research enterprise.

Participants will:

  • Be able to describe the process used to identify the new areas of skills, tools, and mindsets included in the Advanced Research Skills Certificate program in order to discover areas of evolution in their own instruction programs.
  • Be able to summarize the various benefits that the collaboration in this case study offered to each of the stakeholders and collaborators involved in order to identify relevant stakeholders and potential collaborators at their home libraries and institutions.
  • Be able to explain the importance of working across campus units and library departments in order to develop relevant and appropriate goals and learning outcomes for evolving information literacy programs at their home institutions.

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic

Where Knowledge Meets Experience: Emphasizing the Library's Role in an Experiential Learning Initiative
Elizabeth Price and Rebecca Richardson (Murray State University)

Our university adopted Bring Learning to Life as its accreditation-required Quality Enhancement Plan, emphasizing experiential learning to help "students apply principles learned in the classroom in a real-world setting." Where does the library fit into this type of institutional initiative? Almost everywhere! We are providing students with experience through internships and serving as "clients" for course projects, reaching out to new professors in service learning courses and experiential-based capstones, reflecting on how the "real world" should influence our one-shot instructions sessions, and re-examining our own information literacy courses to see how we can incorporate experiential learning ourselves.

Participants will:

  • Identify ways librarians can be embedded into disciplinary experiential learning courses.
  • Analyze existing information literacy courses to see where experiential learning could be added.
  • Identify possible library-community or library-university partnerships as part of a campus-wide initiative.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic