Sessions

Interactive Workshops


A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words -- Or is it?
Sharon Radcliff (CSU East Bay)

Visual literacy has a long history in Academia; in the 1960's John Debbs founded the International Visual Literacy Association. More recently, ACRL has developed its own standards for Visual Literacy: See http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/visualliteracy

In this hands-on workshop we will focus on the critical evaluation of visual images; I will provide participants with a definition of visual literacy and a selected bibliography of sources on teaching information literacy and lead participants through two exercises in visual literacy.

The first exercise focuses on advertising; we will use Jib Fowles' method of analyzing advertisements as described in his article, "Advertising's Fifteen Basic Appeals." I will ask participants to analyze a health food advertisement (provided by the speaker) in groups and research its claims online.

In the second exercise, participants will explore historical and contemporary photographs and critically analyze how well they represent events. Participants will use Google image search and other sources to gather information about the photographs and evaluate them using visual literacy techniques. Each group will then be encouraged to share their discussion highlights with the whole group.

Both exercises will incorporate the development of visual literacy, critical thinking and information literacy skills, using a constructivist-based group framework. Although not required to participate, please bring your mobile device if you have one.

Finally I will lead a general discussion on the concepts of visual literacy and participants will be encouraged to to brainstorm and share ideas on creating visual literacy lesson plans.

Participants will:

  • Be able to articulate how visual literacy is inter-connected to the development of information literacy and life-long learning skills
  • Be able to include visual literacy in teaching media information literacy skills by providing students with a framework to analyze advertisements and research their factual content
  • Be able to provide students with a context in which to deepen their understanding of and critical awareness of journalistic photographs

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Artifacts of Learning: Charting a Library Ethnographic Study
Michael Courtney, Carrie Donovan and Andrew Asher (Indiana University)

In order to design library instruction that is relevant to individuals and institutions, librarians must fully understand our communities of learners and, in turn, reach a full understanding of the ways in which learners engage with information in order to achieve their academic goals. Attaining this understanding by conducting an ethnographic study allows librarians to better understand the ways in which students access, use, and evaluate information and provides unique opportunities to effect changes in the curriculum based on solid evidence. This workshop will provide attendees with an awareness of the process of inquiry underlying ethnography and how it can shape instructional experiences for both teacher and learner. Having used the guiding principles of ethnography to illuminate student beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes, the workshop facilitators will engage participants in the effective application of such methodologies to library instruction. Workshop participants will practice taking an anthropologist's view of learning in order to understand the inquiry questions that can be addressed through ethnography and how such approaches can be built into their instructional repertoire. Whether or not they plan to conduct a formal study, participants will learn how to integrate ethnographic practices into information literacy instruction in order to align teaching with the student experience.

Participants will:

  • Understand the relationship of ethnographic principles to student learning scenarios
  • Identify learning outcomes for assessment through ethnography
  • Practice using select ethnographic instruments in order to apply this assessment approach to a local learning context

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Beyond Eye Candy: Strategies for Engaging Students in Conversations about Visual Literacy
Kristin Fontichiaro (University of Michigan School of Information) and Debbie Abilock (NoodleTools)

Today, our students have a diverse world of process and presentation tools at their fingertips. More and more, you are introducing cutting-edge technologies that allow students to mash-up and create images in sophisticated ways. Learning institutions may falsely assume that students instinctively comprehend visuals and can apply visual literacy strategies to their creations. How do we guide students beyond eye candy to evaluate and use creative visual images that push through to deeper learning and expression? In this interactive workshop, participants will experiment with making a visually-rich claim, discuss strategies for improving, and consider a rubric for assessing visually-rich learning products.

Participants will:

  • Consider their own visual literacy strategies and choices when faced with a design challenge
  • Learn strategies for analyzing and discussing visual literacy techniques with students and instructional colleagues
  • Discuss a rubric for assessment of visual elements in a multimedia presentation

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Broadening Your Palette: Adding Dimension to Lesson Plans Using a Range of Technologies
Linda Miles (Yeshiva Univerisity), Jennifer Poggiali (Lehman College, CUNY), and Phil Poggiali (Pace University)

High-tech tools are often used in the library classroom to enhance and enrich information literacy instruction. But are our choices as instructional designers limited in some ways by a tacit 21st-century technology orientation? What happens if the support for these tools isn't available? In fact, "technology" is a diverse concept. A variety of low-tech and high-tech technologies will provide the backdrop for this interactive workshop; active learning techniques will be foregrounded. Individually and in groups, participants will develop ideas from specific learning objectives; render activities in high- and low-tech variations; and unpack the processes, concepts, and challenges involved.

Participants will:

  • Compare high- and low-tech active learning strategies in order to broaden their pedagogical "toolkit" and inspire creativity
  • Design a high- and a low-tech activity on the same topic in order to understand the different qualities that each can bring to the learning experience
  • Evaluate the impact and effectiveness of high- and low-tech activities in a given circumstance in order to make reasoned decisions about which to use in their lesson plan

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Grand, Rapid Editathon: Using Exciting and Brief Wikipedia-Editing Activities to Teach Information Literacy
John T. Oliver (The College of New Jersey)

Wikipedia activities can facilitate compelling lessons about a wide range of valuable research and writing skills. Perhaps no Wikipedia educational opportunity is as fast (or as exciting) as an "editathon." During these special in-person group meetups, volunteers usually spend several hours creating and refining Wikipedia pages. But what if library educators could harness a much shorter editing blitz to teach information literacy skills? How about an editathon that would fit into a brief one-shot instruction session? This interactive workshop--part hands-on learning activity, part brainstorming session--will be a mini-editathon itself, along with a debriefing discussion and deconstruction. Wikipedia is a platform with excellent potential for encouraging experiential learning opportunities about information literacy. Because students are typically familiar with it and find its content and presentation approachable, it provides a fitting environment for teaching information literacy skills. Thoughtfully constructed lessons can encourage students to think critically about how information is created, reviewed, and refined in Wikipedia as well as in traditional scholarly resources. This session should give participants the opportunity to a) experience firsthand how editathons can teach information literacy lessons, and b) collaboratively generate and refine those teaching points. Although this session should be most beneficial to attendees who bring (and potentially share) a laptop/tablet, a paper-based run-through will also be made available. Wikipedia novices, resisters, and experts (and everyone between) are all welcome.

Participants will:

  • Participate in a Wikipedia-editing activity in order to identify which learning outcomes Wikipedia is well suited to help teach
  • Collaboratively formulate how a typically lengthy activity--a daylong editathon--can be adapted to a shorter but still worthwhile learning exercise

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Information Literacy Challenge: Game On
Andrew Walsh (University of Huddersfield)

Even with limited teaching time, bringing play and games into information literacy instruction is practical and would benefit students directly, both while at university, and equipping them with the skills they need for lifelong learning. Play brings a freedom to explore and innovate, creating 'safe' ways of developing skills such as those required to navigate in the complex, demanding, modern information landscape. It can therefore effectively support the development of those higher level, transferable, information literacy skills. Examples of games used in libraries can be found in the literature, though these often emphasise engagement rather than quality of learning, which can be problematic. This workshop challenges attendees to work in groups to create an outline of an information literacy game in just 50 minutes. Based on experience gained through running day long "Making games for libraries" workshops (http://gamesforlibraries.blogspot.co.uk/), the workshop is structured to allow attendees to work through the basic steps of creating a non-digital library game. Games making materials will be provided and the majority of the session will be spent hands on creating games, operating within the scaffolding provided. Further materials showing the benefits of using play and games in libraries to improve information literacy will be provided for attendees to read afterwards, along with examples of games and resources to help them create their own games and playful activities for information literacy.

Participants will:

  • Be able to construct a basic library game using the scaffolding approach demonstrated
  • Understand the key benefits of using a game based approach to information literacy instruction
  • Know where to go for additional examples of library games that can be adapted for their own libraries

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic; Some experience with the topic


Instruction in Transition: Using iPad-driven Problem-Based Learning to Enhance the Freshman Experience
Rachel W. Gammons, Melissa Gold and Katie Stewart (Millersville University)

As the number of First Year Experience (FYE) courses expand, librarians are being increasingly asked to provide library instruction to these transitional courses, which often lack research assignments. To foster a more meaningful learning experience for FYE students, Millersville University librarians have combined the adaptability of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) with the interactivity of the iPad to create an engaging and collaborative information literacy activity. Please join us and learn how to create and share an FYE PBL using iBooks and iBooks Author. Participants are asked to bring their iPads and to download the iTunes U and iBooks apps before attending; several additional iPads will be provided.

Participants will:

  • Choose a problem-based learning activity appropriate for a First Year Experience class in order to create a meaningful learning experience
  • Identify components of a problem-based learning activity in order to break the activity into assessable parts
  • Create and share instructional materials using iBooks and iTunes U in order to incorporate a problem-based learning activity

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Library Instruction as Participatory Art: Engaging Students with Tablets and Active Learning
Jill Markgraf and John Pollitz (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)

Participatory art engages its audience in the creative process. Similarly, librarians from UW-Eau Claire are engaging their students by "flipping the classroom" and giving students the opportunity to collaborate and actively engage with information literacy concepts and library collections. Student inquiry and exploration guide the process, and active discussion completes the picture. Presenters will discuss how and why they acquired their iPad mobile lab and how they use it to transform any space into an interactive information literacy learning lab. They will bring their collection of iPads and an Apple TV to demonstrate active learning and sharing of concepts and to model techniques for guiding discussions in this environment.. The technology is fun, but this session won't focus entirely on the gadgets, nor will it feature special apps; presenters will share ideas for using the tablets to integrate active learning into information literacy instruction, . Learn strategies for using the technology to enhance rather than drive the lesson. Be prepared to engage with this participatory installation to simulate a classroom exercise.

Participants will:

  • Gain concrete ideas for collaborative interactive activities they can implement in information literacy instruction using tablets and Apple TV technologies
  • Engage in a simulated flipped classroom experience using iPads and Apple TV
  • Receive detailed information on the technical specifications of the equipment used

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic; Some experience with the topic; Considerable experience with the topic


Look at It This Way: Scaffolding Critical Evaluation Using Images and Advertisements
John Watts and Emily Scharf (Webster University)

Teaching information literacy without a research assignment is challenging because students often feel disconnected from their learning without a specific information need. Visual literacy can provide an entry point to critical information analysis in engaging ways. This workshop will identify strategies for developing students' critical thinking skills rather than simply introducing them to library resources. Using images, librarians can teach students about audience, authorship, purpose, and perspective in order to illustrate these concepts as they apply to more complex sources. Attendees will learn methods for using visual literacy as a way of teaching information analysis through a scaffolded, transferable approach.

Participants will:

  • Explore options for incorporating visual literacy into their library instruction in order to scaffold critical evaluation skills
  • Examine alternatives to traditional library instruction activities for first year students in order to prepare students for critical analysis of information rather than the identification of resources
  • Create posters incorporating visual literacy and information literacy concepts in order to introduce these concepts in their own instruction

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic; Some experience with the topic; Considerable experience with the topic


Smoke and Mirrors: Have You Been Faking…Your Teaching?
Rhonda Huisman (Wichita State University)

When students aren't grasping the contents of your instruction session, do you blame a variety of factors—they aren't adequately prepared, not paying attention or simply don't care? Have you considered that it might be: "It's not you—it's me?" Gazing into the instructional mirror might give you a powerful reflection on your teaching, including the time you take to plan or revise content, in-class time, giving feedback, and your assessment strategies. In this session, librarians will face their instructional image to determine if they are utilizing all of their strengths in teaching, as well as identify some possible touch-ups that could frame a better picture for them and their students.

Participants will:

  • Identify principles of teaching and analyze their usefulness in library instruction and assessment practices
  • Develop concepts for reflection and transformation of at least one relevant teaching strategy

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Sorting through the Clutter: Improving Instructional Design through "Card Sorting"
Andreas Orphanides and Anne Burke (North Carolina State University)

Card sorting, a technique from user experience design, is a powerful organizational technique that can be used to create natural groupings of content, and to evaluate established groupings. We present the card sorting methodology and demonstrate how it can be used in an instructional design context to improve alignment between learning goals and curricular content, and to identify themes and patterns in an existing curriculum.

We will begin with a short case study outlining our own experiences with card sorting for curriculum development. We will then provide instruction on the fundamental techniques of both "open" and "closed" card sorting, including variations on the basic approach, and guidance on selecting a specific card sorting technique for a given task.

Participants will then practice the card sorting technique through two group exercises. The first exercise will model a closed card sort, demonstrating the use of the technique in evaluating the alignment of learning goals to curricular content. The second exercise, an open card sort, will model the use of card sorting in structuring curricular content into topical modules. All materials for the exercises will be provided.

The session will close with a group brainstorming session to discuss other potential uses of card sorting, with time for open questions about the session activities and the card sorting technique in general.

Participants will :

  • Learn how and why to apply the card sorting technique and its variations to information organization tasks
  • Gain hands-on experience in using the card sorting technique to identify and organize instructional content

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


The Flipped Canvas: Inverting Information Literacy Instruction
Sara Arnold-Garza and Kimberly Miller (Towson University)

The art of library instruction is changing. Librarians are increasingly expected to teach more students, while also becoming more crafty instructors; transforming already content-packed classes into activity-focused sessions requires creative approaches to instruction. Beginning in the Spring of 2013, the presenters met this challenge with a pilot of the flipped classroom, a model that inverts the traditional placement of lecture and homework, in their own library instruction. In this workshop, participants will gain experience with the flipped classroom as a way to reimagine library instruction, applying a palette of active learning opportunities tailored to their own canvas of learning objectives and teaching settings. Attendees will not only gain the knowledge and vocabulary required to implement a flipped classroom, they will also have a unique opportunity to participate as a learner in one.

Participants will:

  • Be able to describe the flipped classroom teaching model in order to facilitate further discussion in their library settings
  • Be able to identify appropriate tools and teaching scenarios necessary for planning a flipped classroom format that best fits their instructional needs
  • Be able to design flipped classroom information literacy instruction lessons appropriate to their teaching environment

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Presentations


A Tableau Vivant: A Multimodal/MultiSensory Teaching Experience of Threshold Concepts in an Information Literacy Classroom
Kate Langan (Western Michigan University)

Geared more toward an academic information literacy classroom, this presentation presents several different components that ensure a dynamic and collaborative learning environment that is grounded in a curriculum of threshold concepts. This presentation will start by defining the theoretic underpinnings and history of threshold concepts followed by a more refined exploration of what those threshold concepts are for information literacy. The presenter will then elaborate on and demonstrate how librarians can apply this pedagogical approach into the teaching and learning of information literacy. The presentation will then explore one specific threshold concept, that of the academic dialog, and demonstrate how it can be translated into a multisensory experience for students by using background music, whiteboards, concept mapping, drawing, and conversation.

Participants will:

  • Be introduced to threshold concepts specific to IL
  • Learn how to use peer-training and collaborative teaching in the IL classroom
  • Be introduced to ways to promote dynamic learning spaces that break away from teacher-centered classrooms

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


An Embedded Librarian: Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How Well?
Heather James (Marquette University)

This presentation covers a project aimed at evaluating the impact of an embedded librarian in a first year English composition course. Multiple assessment tools were implemented including survey, rubrics, and written reflection, across two, otherwise identical, sections of the course. In addition to detailing these tools and the results, this presentation will cover the curriculum of the Embedded Librarian, examples of digital learning objects created for the course, and implications for larger scale pilots of this program. The presentation is intended for librarians already working in embedded courses and for those hoping to initiate such a program.

Participants will:

  • Develop ideas for developing or expanding Embedded Librarian collaborations with faculty
  • Consider an array of methods for assessing the impact of an Embedded Librarian
  • See digital learning objects as an opportunity to expand instructional efforts

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Bless our Hearts: Going from Earnest to Truly Engaging by Injecting Critical Pedagogy into Information Literacy Instruction
Naomi Stuesser and Sarah Brandt (University of West Georgia)

As new Instructional Services faculty with the University of West Georgia's Ingram Library, we were sure that our instruction offered essential life knowledge and skills to students. To our dismay we realized students placed our workshops and credit bearing research course in the same category as required math: information that they considered inapplicable to their professional and personal lives. In reaction, we've endeavored to take the 'library' out of the 'library class'. Instead of concentrating solely on teaching stereotypical library skills, we employ critical pedagogy to discuss how to conduct research and the power dynamics at play behind information sharing. Critical pedagogues encourage questioning of the traditional classroom environment (teachers as authority, students as passive learners) and perceptions of how information is shared and consumed. We engage students by encouraging them to think critically about the content we present and its applications to their lives. This new perspective has also kept us passionate about our teaching. Our presentation will be an introduction to and continuation of conversations around critical pedagogy and information literacy instruction. During our presentation, we will model critical pedagogy, present a brief overview of the theory and politics that inform this instruction model, and give concrete examples of course and workshop applications that we've employed. Opportunities for discussion among audience members will be interspersed throughout the presentation. Attendees will receive a link to a website containing a bibliography for further exploration as well as sample teaching materials for workshops or courses.

Participants will:

  • Be able to describe the underlying principles of critical pedagogy in order to identify intersections between these principles and information literacy instruction
  • Be able to incorporate critical pedagogy into their own teaching in order to better engage students in learning information literacy concepts

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Collaborating to Unlock Creativity: A Palette of Inspiration
Nicole E. Brown and Susan K. Jacobs (NYU)

Like artists, teaching librarians can select from a range of creative techniques and processes for collaboration – and inspiration is everywhere! In this interactive presentation, a Multidisciplinary Instruction Librarian and a Health Sciences Librarian share the secrets they learned about unlocking creativity while working together on an intensive instructional project. This session will reveal core principles from multiple disciplines that can be used as the raw materials for building a successful collaborative project. The session will draw on work by creative artists, communication experts, as well as emerging scientific research on the impact of the environment on creativity and cognition. Participants will leave with concrete techniques and practical advice for discovering a palette of inspiration for peer collaborations and injecting creativity, whimsy, and fun into their ongoing work.

Participants will:

  • Reflect on the value of peer partnerships in order to use creativity to enhance instructional projects
  • Implement creative techniques that spark the imagination in order to apply them to collaborative instructional initiatives

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Collaborators in Course Design: A Librarian and Publisher at the Intersection of Information Literacy & Scholarly Communication
Catherine Fraser Riehle (Purdue University)

This session will focus on a university press director and academic librarian's collaborative effort to design and teach an undergraduate honors course on publishing and scholarly communication. The project-based course, first offered Spring 2014, weaves students through practical application of the publication process (the publisher's perspective) while engaging in conversation, debate, and research related to the complex ethical, legal, social, and cultural aspects of scholarly communication (the author's perspective). The librarian/publisher collaboration will be described in the context of course design and implementation, and preliminary assessment and evaluation data will be shared. Attendees should emerge with ideas for teaching partnerships and for active learning and assessment activities related to publishing and scholarly communication.

Participants will:

  • Articulate at least one potential collaboration related to the intersection of information literacy and scholarly communication
  • Develop active learning strategies for engaging undergraduate students in topics and issues related to publishing and scholarly communication

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Combating a Zombie Apocalypse through Subject-Specific Research: A Topic Selection Practice
Alicia Salaz and Teresa MacGregor (Carnegie Mellon University, Qatar)

In library instruction, problem-based, course-integrated, and point-of-need instructional methods are widely recognized as best practices which enhance student motivation and learning. Topic choice significantly influences the achievement of these instructional facets. In designing research projects for students, however, instructors often assign topics which lack authenticity or relevance, are too narrow or broad in scope, or fail to motivate. We propose a method for generating research topics by simulating a significant problem which draws on a pop culture phenomenon (in this case, the zombie apocalypse). This problem requires discipline-based solutions and aims to enhance motivation and increase learning. We also report on the results of the use of this method with students. The session will close by asking participants to brainstorm/generate similar real-world/pop culture information problem scenarios that might stimulate better topic development by students within their own institutions/disciplines. These ideas will be collated and shared amongst program participants as a take-away.

Participants will:

  • Be able to compare and articulate the effects of various research topic development techniques in order to evaluate them for suitability to the local context
  • Be able to develop recommendations for the use of various topic development techniques, either for themselves or instructional partners (such as faculty members)

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Creating New Compositions: Using Prezi Palettes to Reinvigorate Information Literacy Instruction
Terri Artemchik and Amy Fyn (Coastal Carolina University)

The information literacy program at Coastal Carolina University reinvigorated instruction of high-volume first year courses through strategic use of Prezi, a web-based tool that allows users to design presentations from a blank canvas. The challenge we faced was teaching a common set of skills across a variety of assignments. Librarians harnessed Prezi's flexibility to address the core skills while adapting presentations to respond to the specifics of individual faculty assignments. We will show you how to design a Prezi based on defined learning outcomes for a specific course to promote consistency and programmatic cohesiveness. Starting from this basic design plan, librarians can then customize the template by adding the essential concepts or skills needed based on the assignment and instructor requests, along with additional relevant materials, activities and assessments to complete the customized lesson plans. The benefits of using customizable templates include more engaged and interested students, reduced preparation time and the ability to maintain instructor authenticity by adapting to personal teaching style. Access to a set of useful, attractive and consistent templates to use and reuse can both increase knowledge of good Prezi design and promote best practices in Prezi usage. Basic templates will be made available for attendees to copy and retool for their individual or program practice.

Participants will:

  • Consider the merits of standardizing some aspects of library instruction in order to meet information literacy program learning outcomes
  • Identify at least two information literacy concepts that may lend themselves to Prezi use in order to create a basic goal for a Prezi
  • Learn some of the pros and cons of Prezi use in library instruction

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Exposure to Infographics: Focus on Active Learning
Melanie Parlette-Stewart and Lindsey Robinson (University of Guelph)

Infographics bring together information, data and design. Infographics are becoming an increasingly popular component of the information landscape. Whether evaluating or creating infographics, it is incessary to use and apply information literacy skills in addition to visual literacy skills. The ACRL Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education highlight the increasing need to be visually literate in the 21st century. This session will highlight the connection between the ACRL Visual Literacy Standards to infographics and the techniques used in applying active learning and creating an opportunity for students to "make" their own infographic through an introductory infographics session. The presenters will discuss the process of creating a lesson plan that was focused on "making" an infographic and active learning. The session moves from instruction and introduction to placing the student at the centre of their own learning experience, providing them with an opportunity to think creatively and engage with the information. The workshop provides a unique learning environment for students to engage with infographics without having to negotiate complicated software or digital tools. This session is relevant to instructional librarians who are interested in providing supplemental / self-directed instruction on infographics or wish to integrate infographics or visual literacy skills into their teaching. In creating an introductory infographics class, the team is able to plan for future scaffolding where specific tools and approaches for creating infographics might be taught.

Participants will:

  • Explore ACRL Visual Literacy Competency Standards and their application to an infographics instruction session
  • Learn techniques for applying active learning to an introductory infographics session

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


From Hack to Herzog: Supporting Research-Based Student-Made Documentaries as the New "Research Paper"
Glenda Insua and Annie Armstrong (University of Illinois at Chicago)

When it comes to translating scholarly research findings into messages which are easily digestible by the general public, brief video documentaries are arguably a stronger vehicle than the traditional research paper—at least when effectively executed. Using the case study of a research paper turned short video documentary assignment, this presentation examines how librarians can support visual literacy skills amongst novices, helping them transform research findings into effectively constructed, well-researched, and ethically responsible short films. Presenters will engage attendees throughout the presentation by modeling active learning techniques and leading critical exercises to build a community of practice around teaching visual literacy skills.

Participants will:

  • Be able to recognize the value of assigning documentaries as an alternative to traditional research papers in order to engage students with a broad range of learning styles in the research process
  • Be able to identify active learning strategies for teaching visual literacy skills in order to prepare students to effectively analyze and produce research-based video assignments

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


From Recommendations to Reality: Designing Effective Online Tutorials
Lindsey McLean (Loyola Marymount University)

This presentation will introduce two sets of design considerations for the development of online information literacy instruction and show how these considerations were implemented in the construction and implementation of Loyola Marymount University's First Year Seminar information literacy tutorial. The first set of best practices focuses on the visual and technical elements of a tutorial including User Control, Visual and Information Clarity, Navigation, and Accessibility. The second set addresses "best practices" in online instructional design and pedagogy and includes categories for Embedding Communication, Incorporating Active Learning, and Designing Test Questions. In order to be broadly applicable, each set of design considerations is intentionally formatted so that it may serve as rubric for assessing any online tutorial and will be made available both online and as handout for presentation attendees. This presentation also identifies the most common types of active learning exercises observed within the online tutorial environment, allowing attendees to gather ideas for maximizing good design elements and embedding active learning components into their own online tutorials.

Participants will :

  • Be able to implement the two sets of best practices for the creation of online learning in their home institutions

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Hopes, Impressions, and Reality: Is a Discovery Layer the Answer?
Susan Avery and Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Web-scale discovery systems are increasingly more prominent on library webpages and their use as an undergraduate research tool has been widely promoted. When the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign undertook implementing a discovery layer, a team within the library was appointed to closely examine the potential of such a tool and in doing so documented some surprising results. This session will share the results of our testing using student research topics and captured search logs and pose questions for others to consider when implementing discovery systems and determining their role in library instruction, particularly as it relates to undergraduate student research. Are they appropriate tools for undergraduates? Can they replace the multitude of subject-specific databases? What sources should be included in a discovery layer? In this session we seek to delve more deeply into such questions and ultimately examine a critically important question: Is discovery the answer?

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify strengths and weaknesses in discovery system searching in order to help users determine the best resource for their searches
  • Be able to develop and apply testing strategies related to user search behavior and expected student learning outcomes in order to evaluate the role of a web-scale discovery layer in library instruction

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


How Do Our Students Learn: A Cognitive Psychological Model for Information Literacy Instruction
Dani Brecher (Claremont Colleges) and Kevin Michael Klipfel (CSU-Chico)

Effective student-centered pedagogy requires a deep understanding of how students learn. Current research in the cognitive science of learning provides important insight into how instructors can encourage learners to both retain and transfer new knowledge, two classic measures of student learning. While the current library literature discusses the application of learning theories to library instruction, there is little discussion of how empirical research on the relationship between cognition and learning can enhance information literacy instruction in the physical and digital classroom. The study of cognition can help librarians make their sessions count. This session will outline a framework for high-impact information literacy instruction based on five key principles drawn from the educational psychology literature related to the cognitive science of learning. The presenters will suggest concrete strategies for designing effective information literacy instruction based on these five empirically grounded principles, and take the audience through the planning of a sample information literacy session adhering to these principles.

Participants will:

  • Understand the relevance of cognitive psychology for information literacy instruction
  • Describe five principles from the cognitive science of learning and relate them to information literacy instruction
  • Apply these empirically grounded strategies to planning information literacy sessions geared toward the retention of information literacy concepts, critical thinking about information, and the transfer of information literacy skills to new contexts

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


In the Eyes of the Beholder: Finding the Beauty in Discovery Tools
Nancy Fawley (University of Nevada Las Vegas) and Nikki Krysak (Norwich University)

Academic libraries continue to commit large amounts of their limited budgets to discovery tools. However, librarians, who are in a position to promote and teach their usefulness, remain divided in their support for these tools. Some librarians embrace discovery tools while others quiver in their wake; this lack of consensus has consequences beyond the library classroom. This presentation discusses the results of a survey on discovery tool use in library instruction and proposes ideas for garnering support for their use in the classroom. The presenters surveyed instruction librarians to find out their likes and dislikes about using the tool and what prevents them from using a discovery tool in instruction. Data was analyzed, key threads of resistance were identified, and alternate methods of instruction were developed to address survey findings. Learning depends on skills, not tools. When introducing a discovery tool in the context of a threshold concept, librarians must demonstrate the value in understanding how a database has structure and how information is organized within that structure. Learning alternate ways to use discovery tools in instruction can help to create a consensus in their use among librarians. The presenters use these threads to establish customized instruction models that might charm even the hardest skeptic.

Participants will:

  • Understand barriers that keep librarians from using a discovery tool in the instruction setting
  • Learn strategies for encouraging discovery tool use in order to create a sustainable and consistent information literacy program
  • Learn methods for integrating discovery tools in order to augment existing information literacy programs

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic


Information Literacy at the Crossroads: The Convergence Between the Research and the Writing Processes
Susan Ariew (University of South Florida)

If you have ever helped a student who is struggling with a topic for a research assignment, then you have also participated in helping that student with the part of the writing process called prewriting, which is everything that a scholar does before he or she sits down to write a research paper. This presentation will discuss the deep connection between writing and research processes, where they intersect, and how being cognizant of the connections between the two can help librarians create instructional sessions and outcomes that transcend traditional library instruction strategies.

Participants will:

  • Compare the writing process and the research process
  • Discuss the role of librarians in the writing process and how it affects collaboration with academic faculty
  • Identify resources and teaching strategies that assist students with both the writing and the research processes at the "crossroads" where they intersect.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Inquiry-Based Learning Online: Designing and Delivering a Blended and Embedded Information Literacy Program
Alan Carbery and Janet Cottrell (Champlain College)

This paper presents Champlain College Library's innovative approach to reestablishing its information literacy instructional outreach to all traditional undergraduate students following changes in the second year of the College’s common Core curriculum. Continuing our commitment to inquiry-based information literacy instruction, the teaching librarians designed a combination of asynchronous online and synchronous classroom-based information literacy lessons. These lessons would be embedded within all available courses in the second year. In an effort to reduce student information literacy fatigue and repetitious lessons, the librarians employed a creative subject-lens approach to the information literacy themes for the second year. This approach resulted in students receiving two unique instruction interactions per semester with librarians – either blended, entirely in-class or entirely online.

During this session, the presenters will describe the context leading up to this redesign, discuss the challenges of revising what had been widely viewed as a successful program, and share their approach to the redesign process. The session will define inquiry-based learning and demonstrate the successful use of inquiry-based teaching methods in both face-to-face and asynchronous online learning environments. Preliminary findings of our comparative analysis across the blended approach to delivering instruction will be outlined. The presenters will also reflect on the overall impact of the redesign process.

Participants will:

  • Be able to map and design an incremental and blended information literacy program
  • Learn how to implement a model of blended information literacy instruction
  • Explore ways to assess and evaluate student performance in an online, inquiry-based learning environment

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Jump into the Game: How Libraries Can Adapt to Institutional Assessment Plans
Jessica Crossfield McIntosh, Rares Piloiu and Amy Parsons (Otterbein University)

With many institutions of higher learning beginning to implement campus-wide assessment programs, the instructional librarians are often left to figure out for themselves how they will become part of this effort. Three librarians from Otterbein University will discuss current strategies to align information literacy assessment with institutional assessment and university goals. This presentation will offer ideas for creative interpretation and visualization of institutional assessment through practical examples, handouts, and visual demonstrations. We will also discuss strategies for developing partnerships at the departmental and administrative level and the value of the library being an integral part of the assessment process.

Participants will:

  • Learn how to compare library-specific and institution-wide student learning outcomes
  • Explore ways to develop new faculty-librarian collaborations based on shared assessment needs
  • Consider the compatibility between their assessment methods and the language of their measured learning outcomes

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic


Letting Gogh of the Traditional Lecture and Lab: Flipping the Business Information Literacy Classroom
Ilana Barnes (Purdue University)

In the 2013 school year, a team of librarians in the Parrish Library for Management and Economics transformed a business information literacy course from a traditional lecture, 40-student, computer-lab class into multiple sections of a flipped, 70 student, computer-less class in order to meet the request of the department that the successful course be required for all 500 students. This process required examining the methods in which the class was delivered and the adaptation of flipped learning techniques for better utilization of library teaching resources. This talk will describe the integration of blended/flipped learning and their assessed results, with key insights for others interested in implemented similar classes or integrating video lectures, quizzes and screencasts into their one-shots or embedded work.

This session is meant for instruction librarians inside and outside of business librarianship who are looking at implementing online/flipped information literacy programs. It may be particularly useful for librarians who have struggled with how to deliver information literacy instruction uniformly across large populations (such as the 500 students) but maintain an active learning environment. In order to incorporate the "visual" theme and to aid visual auditory learners, the slides will be presented entirely with pictures, videos and numbers/ charts. For those who learn by reading, a handout of the outline of the talk and syllabus for the class will also be provided.

Participants will:

  • Be able to describe flipped methods of business information literacy content delivery in order to assess which ones best fit their resources and objectives

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Looking into Infinity: Using the Deep Web as a Pedagogical Tool
Erik Radio (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

The vast majority of internet resources reside in what is known as the Deep Web. Consisting of information that cannot be effectively indexed by search engines, instruction in this vast resource is critical for informing students as to the nature of effective internet search strategies within a larger context than the library. The University of Illinois developed a workshop on this topic for use in its Savvy Researcher Series. This session will explore the nature of the Deep Web, its value as a pedagogical tool for effective searching, and how Deep Web search strategies reinforce those used for research using library resources. The structure of the workshop will be outlined as a possible template for use, as well as other ways to incorporate the Deep Web into instructional sessions.

Participants will:

  • Be able to describe the structure of the Deep Web and how search engines index web resources
  • Be able to develop their own Deep Web sessions based on the example from The University of Illinois, and tailor it to the specific needs of their student body

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Making our own Canvas: How We Did a Comprehensive Review of our Information Literacy Program
John J Meier and Anne Behler (Penn State University)

A small team of librarians acting as consultants to our own library were asked to provide a comprehensive review of the information literacy program and made recommendations for a more unified, consistent approach. In the course of only a few months, we reviewed both the broader profession and current internal practices to outline a vision for our information literacy program. Our approach began by splitting responsibilities for the review into four sections: Benchmarking, Investigating Tools, Assessment, and Professional Development. Benchmarking was a look outward to the profession and peer institutions to see current practice and new innovations. Software and tools for teaching and learning were investigated for in-person, online, or blended teaching. We assessed the characteristics of our information literacy program against the best practices published by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). For professional development we investigated programming and the development of a community of practice. Some of the keys to our success which we will highlight are the amount of trust we shared in order to work independently and the close collaboration on the final editing of the report. We will talk about using technology throughout the process to ease collaboration and co-authoring. Our work culminated in the whitepaper "Moving Forward: Envisioning Instructional Services for the Future". We also established of a Community of Practice concurrently with this study. The University Libraries at Penn State are one library, geographically distributed over 23 campuses with over 100 librarians with instructional services spread throughout the organization.

Participants will:

  • Be able to plan a comprehensive study of their library's instructional programs
  • Be able to identify partners within their libraries in planning their information literacy strategy

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Mass Producing a Masterpiece: Designing a Required One Credit, Distributed Learning Information Literacy Course
Karen Brown and Sharon Verba (University of South Carolina)

The presenters will share their experiences in mass-producing a one credit, online information literacy course. The process by which a face-to-face course was re-designed and developed to become a distributed learning course for up to 80 sections per year reaching 2,000 students will be covered. The challenges associated with transferring a skill based, face to face curriculum into a distributed learning environment have been many and it has quickly been discovered that a nimble canvass on which to lay, mix, and reshape a masterpiece is a must. The masterpiece is constantly shifting and changing as we learn more about what works and does not work in the eyes of our beholders, the students. Assessments, including quizzes, assignments, and rubrics, must frequently be adjusted. As well, the curriculum must be revised to effectively meet course learning outcomes, to make for a transferable, relevant student learning experience, and to meet evolving online instruction expectations. Specific examples will be shared of issues that arose when trying to transfer successful face-to-face instruction to a distributed learning course. The presenters will also discuss the part of a masterpiece that rarely gets noticed: the frame, which holds it and allows it to shine. In this case the frame is the academic structure which includes overall course management, technical support and development, and student and instructor support. Insight will also be given regarding what to expect when the library evolves into an academic unit.

Participants will:

  • Be able to apply backwards design process in order to design and develop a distributed learning information literacy course
  • Be able to describe challenges associated with transforming a skill based, face to face curriculum into a distributed learning environment in order to design lesson plans and other learning materials
  • Be able to identify the necessary infrastructure in order to develop and maintain large-scale delivery of a credit bearing information literacy course

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Mixing in New Colors: Using the Train-the-Trainer Model to Create Information Literacy Co-Instructors
Patricia Hartman (Auburn University) and Valerie Perry (University of Kentucky)

Using the train-the-trainer (TTT) model as our foundation, we created a new information literacy program in an introductory Biology lab. We will describe the program's development, implementation, and evolution since its beginnings in late 2012. We also will share the advantages of using the train-the-trainer model in an information literacy program, particularly regarding its potential both to reduce librarians' time commitment and help them build lasting relationships with faculty and graduate students. In the span of two semesters, we co-taught 78 sessions of BIO 155, reaching nearly 2,200 attendees total. We were able to engage students with active participation, alternating between PowerPoint, live literature searches, and in-class exercises. In our case, employing TTT allowed us to build a new information literacy program for Biology students from scratch without overburdening librarians or taking away from other courses. We believe this model is unique because it has a less tangible, but potentially more lasting effect. We are creating more than assistants; rather, we are creating co-instructors who bring their own set of experiences and observations to the table. This collaborative program in general helps us reach more students than ever and create lasting partnerships with faculty and graduate students.

Participants will:

  • Identify the benefits of the train-the-trainer model in an academic setting
  • Explore how the train-the-trainer program could be applied at their own institution

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Mixing it Up: Librarian-Faculty Collaboration to Develop and Implement a Digital Learning Badges Program Promoting Information Literacy
Bee Gallegos (Arizona State University)

Digital learning badges offer a unique way to integrate information literacy skills within the curriculum. At Arizona State University, the need to reach transfer students resulted in a collaboration between librarians and an academic college to pilot a learning badges program that addresses the challenges of reaching all students including face-to-face and online and will serve as a model for other academic programs. In an environment of limited resources, learning badges provide a vehicle to sequence and assess student learning, are scalable and integrated across multiple disciplines and campuses and offer faculty a menu of choices to match skills with course goals. Students can learn and demonstrate information and research proficiency by completing modules within the learning badges program. A digital learning badge, awarded upon completion of the modules within each badge, represents attainment of a skill and serves as a form of micro-credentialing. The pilot will serve as a model for other academic programs. Lessons learned and current status of the program will be discussed.

Participants will:

  • Learn and apply new approaches to integrating information and research skills via online modules that are sequenced, scalable, can be assessed and build student proficiency
  • Identify opportunities for building and leveraging faculty collaboration in order to influence curricular integration of information skills across multiple disciplines at their home institutions
  • Learn to design and construct learning activities that are flexible and can be tailored to meet different disciplinary and instructional environments

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Moving from Monet to Banksy - How Analysis of Information Literacy Data Directs the Creation of Dynamic Online Tutorials
Gail Strachan and Adele Magowan (Seneca College)

Seneca Libraries started with a blank canvas in order to create a picture of where and whom we were teaching. This masterpiece of collection and analysis of information literacy data led to strategic initiatives that would creatively transform how we teach. In order to provide the Seneca College community with a consistent and sustainable level of high-quality information literacy instruction, the evaluation of the data steered us into the photorealism realm with the formation of engaging online tutorials. Learn how our thirteen tutorial works of art form a tapestry that allow us to engage our students from afar. The presentation will sketch out the collaborative process Seneca Libraries engaged in to create the information literacy data collection tool, the data analysis and management agreement to the comprehensive and extensive project of video creation. The audience will leave the session with a portrait of our evidence based rationale for creating the online videos, as well as a practical vignette of the process of the video creation.

Participants will:

  • Outline the process of capturing information literacy activity data in order to paint a numerical picture of an information literacy program
  • Identify the instructional design considerations when creating online learning objects
  • Develop a plan for creating online video tutorials to actively engage students in information literacy skill development

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Owning the Stage: Using Dramatic Theory to Improve Teaching
Lindsey Rae (Champlain College)

William Shakespeare said, "All the world's a stage, / […] And one man in his time plays many parts." That statement rings true in the classroom, and as librarians teaching one-shot sessions, we have many parts to play. We are always looking for ways to make our sessions with students more engaging. One way to accomplish this is by stepping out of our comfort zones and borrowing principles from other disciplines, specifically acting. This presentation will focus on utilizing dramatic theory to improve three interconnected principles of acting and teaching: connection, communication, and confidence. Drawing from the literature and personal experience, this presentation will demonstrate through examples how the tenets of acting and dramatic theory can help us better connect with students.

Participants will:

  • Be able to evaluate personal physicality and vocal intonation in order to make conscious and intentional changes to improve a connection with students
  • Assess student engagement in order to inform delivery and presentation choices of classroom conten
  • Employ improvisation techniques in order to improve confidence and presence in the classroom

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Painting on an Electronic Easel: Tips and Tricks for Using a Smart Board in Library Instruction
Lindy Scripps-Hoekstra (Grand Valley State University)

Smart Boards (interactive whiteboards) have become increasingly common in education, from K-12 classrooms to university settings. There has been much written connecting Smart Boards to enhanced active learning opportunities and engagement, and librarians should be prepared to utilize this innovative technology. Led by a high school teacher-turned-academic librarian, this presentation will examine the benefits and challenges of using a Smart Board in IL instruction and equip participants with a toolkit of lesson ideas to implement whether you have a Smart Board or are just curious as to how this technology could impact instruction.

Participants will:

  • Be able to apply Smart Board instructional methods to one of their own favorite lessons by discussing ideas and possibilities with a fellow participant
  • Be able to identify key research connecting the use of Smart Boards with increased student engagement
  • Recognize the potential problems in using Smart Boards and how to proactively prevent them

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Painting the Big Picture: Presenting Core Information Literacy Concepts through Instructional Videos
Jennifer Garrett and Andreas Orphanides (North Carolina State University)

Librarians at North Carolina State University Libraries are creating "Big Picture" videos that address common conceptual problems in information literacy. Rather than teaching viewers "how to do X" -- e.g., find a scholarly article -- these projects focus on concepts that underlie information literacy and provide a foundation on which to develop information literacy skills. The videos transcend institutional specifics of how to search within a given library, and can be reused or adapted to fit specific institutional needs.

This presentation will focus on the creation, use, and reuse of our Big Picture videos. We will highlight our approach to video creation, including topic selection, the instructional design process (scripting, storyboarding, technology used, etc.), and evaluation of costs and benefits of undertaking these projects. We will also emphasize our collaboration with instructors and student animators. Additionally, we will provide examples of how the videos can be used by librarians and faculty at NCSU and beyond. Lastly, we will highlight examples of how these videos have been remixed under Creative Commons by other institutions for their own instructional purposes. Attendees will leave the presentation with an understanding of how they can use these videos for their own purposes or embark on creating a Big Picture video of their own.

See several (but not all) of the videos here:
Peer Review in 5 Minutes: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/pr/
Picking Your Topic IS Research: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/picking_topic/
From Idea to Library: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/idea_library/

Participants will:

  • Develop a comprehensive understanding of the process of creating a concept-driven instructional video, including time, instructional design, and technological considerations
  • Learn techniques for adopting and adapting reusable Big Picture video content for their specific instructional goals and needs

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Partnering to Picture a Plagiarism Prevention Pattern
Frances Whaley (Illinois Valley Community College)

As part of a campus-wide computer and information literacy initiative, the Respecting Intellectual Property Project Team at Illinois Valley Community College collaboratively created an online tutorial for educating students to avoid plagiarism. The session will showcase both the final product and the process team members followed in developing the tutorial. Participants with their own devices may try the tutorial and determine if it is appropriate to adapt for use at their own institutions. Although there is a single presenter for this session, the content included represents the perspectives of the entire team who developed the tutorial along with examples of faculty and student feedback about the effectiveness of the tutorial.

Participants will:

  • Be able to analyze and evaluate whether the Avoid Plagiarism Tutorial developed by Illinois Valley Community College may be used or modified for their own institutional implementation
  • Be able to construct an instructional tool with a similar collaborative process as the one outlined in the session

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Preparing Librarians to be Campus Leaders through Mapping and Integrating Information Literacy into Curriculum
Li Wang (University of Auckland) and Sharon Weiner (Purdue University)

Curriculum mapping is a process by which curricula are methodically examined to determine where information literacy (IL) capabilities are, or should be taught during formal coursework. Curriculum integration is the process of intentionally integrating IL capability at the points in coursework when students need to master those capabilities and competencies. During this session, librarians will develop an understanding of curriculum mapping and how to integrate IL in curricula. This knowledge prepares librarians for campus leadership, since the curriculum is the primary focus of teaching and learning and affects the entire campus.

The curriculum in higher education can be viewed as: the intended curriculum (the institution's expectation of what is to be taught or learned), the offered curriculum (what teachers teach or plan to teach), and the received curriculum (the knowledge and skills that are actually learned by students via the courses).

Curriculum mapping analyzes the offered curriculum and maps it against the intended curriculum. The purpose of curriculum mapping is to identify the gaps in IL capabilities in the curriculum and to fill those gaps by integrating IL into the curriculum.

This presentation will demonstrate how to analyze the offered program curriculum; how to map it against the intended curriculum; and how to integrate IL into the curriculum. It will provide higher education faculty, librarians, and administrators with strategies for integration of information literacy into the curriculum.

Finally, the presenters will discuss a project to assess the degree to which IL is integrated into curricula. This is a collaborative project that will involve US and New Zealand colleges and universities. This project will result in cross institutional comparison data that should strengthen justifications for engaging in curriculum mapping and integration projects.

Participants will:

  • Understand the meaning of "intended curriculum" and "offered curriculum" to gain new understanding of curriculum structure in an institution
  • Understand how to identify potential academic courses for integrating IL across the curriculum and how to redesign course curricula by integrating IL into the curriculum
  • Understand the institutional perspective for assessing the achievement of IL curriculum integration

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Preparing Students for the Real World: Giving Future Professionals a Palette of Practical Information Literacy Tools and Skills
Imelda Vetter (University of Alabama at Birmingham)

Librarians understand that information literacy skills are not only relevant to students as they complete class assignments and write research papers, but also as they prepare for future professional success. Upon completing their college educations, students will continue to need information resources to keep informed and up-to-date with current relevant issues, to explore and adopt new ideas and skills, to perform their professional duties in an evidence-based manner and to fuel creative juices in order to invigorate their daily practice. The basic skills of search, selection, and evaluation attained during their time in higher education must follow them into their professional lives. Librarians at University of Alabama at Birmingham offer professional skills certificate programs in the fields of education, business, and social sciences, with an engineering program in development. This presentation will address all stages undertaken to build these certificate programs: soliciting support, planning curriculum, creating teaching and learning materials, marketing to students and faculty, implementing the plan, and assessing the effectiveness of the programs.

Participants will:

  • Be able to recognize the future information literacy needs of students as they prepare for the practicalities of their specific career paths
  • Be able to describe a library program that will equip students with information literacy skills critical for future professional success
  • Be able to formulate a plan to solicit support, to develop the curriculum, to create teaching and learning materials, to market to the appropriate audience, and to assess the program

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Primary Colors: The Art of Teaching and Learning with Primary Sources in the Library
Adam Beauchamp (Tulane University)

Students in history and social science courses are often assigned research projects that require them to use primary sources available in their campus libraries, archives, and online collections. Identifying relevant primary sources, however, requires a creative process not always taught or practiced in the classroom, and often students mistakenly assume that searching for and using primary sources is the same skill set they use for secondary sources.
In this session we will explore the pedagogy behind teaching with primary sources, and practical ways to apply the theory using active learning, common library materials, and a little bit of faculty collaboration. In addition to learning about successful library instruction experiences with sociology and history methods courses, participants will be encouraged to consider and discuss how this approach to primary sources in the library can be used at their home institutions, using local collections, and in multiple disciplines.

Participants will:

  • Recognize the challenges students face when using and searching for primary sources
  • Will explore pedagogical and practical reasons to focus on how to use primary sources instead of how to find them in library instruction sessions
  • Will imagine and discuss ways to integrate primary source materials into effective information literacy instruction at their home institutions

Intended Audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Ride, SALI, Ride: A Dashboard Approach to Instruction Program Management
Laurie Sutch and Doreen Bradley (University of Michigan)

At the University of Michigan Library, we developed the Scheduling App for Library Instruction (SALI) to manage the hundreds of sessions we teach each year. Through a single interface, faculty and librarians submit requests for instruction on particular topics. Schedulers are automatically notified, and they reserve rooms, assign instructors, connect session evaluations, and email faculty. Library instructors can "claim" sessions, thus adding the session to their Google calendars; they can also add statistics and see evaluation results from the same dashboard. Data is archived annually. Session participants will see how they might adapt a similar application for their campuses.

When a library instructional session is requested, multiple administrative pieces need to fall into place before the session can occur, such as finding and reserving a room, scheduling an instructor (and getting the correct information on various calendars), and creating/attaching an evaluation form. At a large library such as ours, this is particularly challenging because we have many different room choices across multiple buildings, and several administrative units who are charged with this task. Additionally, within the app faculty can select from a "topics" menu, which shows the approximate time needed to cover the material requested, so the faculty member has a realistic idea of how much can be done in the time they have allotted. With the help of our Learning Technologies Incubation Group at the University of Michigan Library, we have developed an innovative solution to help us manage the administration of the hundreds of sessions we teach each year.

Participants will:

  • See the possibilities of developing a similar tool on their campuses
  • Realize the value of such a tool for managing their data, and using this data to inform their own goals and demonstrate campus partnerships and integration

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Sculpting the Mind, Shaping the Learner: Mindfulness Practices in the Classroom
Jill E. Luedke (Temple University) and Deborah Ultan Boudewyns (University of Minnesota)

Teaching librarians are gaining greater responsibility in the classroom with high expectations to facilitate learning in a way that supports and encourages lifelong research skills. Likewise, students arrive in the classroom with varying levels of motivation, perspective and attentiveness to research. It is part of our responsibility to give students tools to help them navigate their frustrations and preconceptions about research. Helping students to manage distractions and clear their mind clutter can prepare them to be more receptive learners. Librarians who practice mindfulness can engage in deeper listening, compassion, and greater attentiveness with their students.

Incorporating mindfulness practices into our pedagogies can create an engaged learning environment in which both teacher and student are more focused and attentive to each other. Mindfulness in teaching, or contemplative pedagogy, has been a growing instruction model over the past fifteen years. Following on the theories and methodologies of established constituents along with their own finely tuned practices, presenters will identify for attendees how the use of meditation and other mindful techniques can foster a more productive learning experience. Presenters will share how their years of experience with yoga, meditation, and mindfulness influence their teaching, and they will demonstrate simple techniques that attendees can incorporate into their own pedagogy to help students manage their research with greater awareness, patience, and focus. Presenters will discuss current research on the benefits of mindfulness practices and the use of these practices in higher education.

Participants will:

  • Be able to implement mindfulness practices in the classroom in order to create a more engaged learning environment

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Simple Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Maps and Information Literacy
Andrew Battista (University of Montevallo)

Geographic Information Systems projects (GIS) are interactive representations of information on maps that illustrate how societies develop and change over time. Fundamentally, GIS projects are visual constructions of complex social, economic, and cultural phenomena, and they invite students to locate information and deliver it via a spatial medium. Just about any research question in any discipline can be framed and explored on a map. In this session, I will argue for the place of GIS projects in information literacy learning, explain how to make free platforms like Google Maps and Google Fusion tables accessible to students, and suggest that GIS projects are conducive to innovative forms of information literacy instruction.

Participants will:

  • Understand the role of GIS products like Google Fusion Tables in information literacy learning
  • Develop the ability to create information literacy-intensive assignments that ask students to create interactive maps

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Sketches to a Masterpiece in Assessment
Ann Roselle and Christine Moore (Phoenix College)

Developing an effective library instruction assessment plan isn't a mere paint by numbers process. However, there are some key techniques that helped a community college library, once at an assessment standstill, create a masterpiece with a meaningful composition embraced by each librarian. Participants will learn these artistic techniques to prepare a canvas for their own assessment masterpieces. On the presentation palette will be samples of in-class assessment methods and recommendations for effectively capturing assessment results.

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify key elements for designing a successful assessment plan
  • Be able to relate assessment techniques to their own institution

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic


Something Old Can Be New Again: Learning Commons Policies & Outreach Development
Nikhat J. Ghouse (University of Kansas) and Kawanna Bright (Florida International University)

Over the last twenty years, learning spaces have become normal occurrences in most academic libraries. This rise in the creation of learning spaces versus study spaces is related to the goal of libraries to match the university's institutional or strategic directives. In this revamped environment students and space alike have been rejuvenated.

At Florida International University, a service plan was created for the newly renovated Technology Hub (The Hub @ Green Library). This service plan includes policies related to how students use the learning space, as well as how librarians work in the space. At the University of Kansas, the Learning Studio at Anschutz Library does not formally have librarians in the space, so the policies focus on bringing the University's academic departments into the space to work with the students. Through the development of a formalized outreach program, these departments engage students during peak times throughout the semester to promote academic resource, services, and opportunities to an audience of undergraduates.

This presentation will discuss the evolution of learning commons spaces, and the efforts undertaken by libraries to be relevant within those spaces. We will discuss how libraries and academic/non-academic student support departments can help each other with the same goal of improved student success as indicated by better study habits, improved grades and timely graduation. The presenters will discuss the impact that outreach efforts can have on improving student/librarian engagement, and how policy development can integrate library needs, student needs, and address collaboration with university partners

Participants will:

  • Be able to discover the possibilities and opportunities that outreach provides in order to develop their own learning commons outreach program
  • Be able to recognize the value of policy implementation in order to understand the role that policies play in creating collaboration
  • Be able to adapt the information and materials provided by the presenters in order to apply what they have learned to their home institutions

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Splashes Of Color: Quick And Easy Active Learning Assessments In Your Library Classroom
Maoria Kirker (Creighton University), Zoe Fisher (Pierce College) and Elise Ferer (Dickinson College)

In this session, three ACRL Teacher Track '13 alumnae, representing a community college and two liberal arts colleges, will share how they brought one-shot instruction to life with active learning assessments. Attendees will learn a variety of meaningful, quick, and painless strategies for assessing students and providing evidence of learning in information literacy sessions. The presenters will share the following experiences with active learning assessments. When working with first-year classes, a librarian from a small liberal arts college created short assignments that students complete before or after a class session, which were used to craft outcomes and curriculum, and were used as evidence of student learning. Another liberal arts college librarian will share how she modified her active learning activities in order to produce evidence of learning related to the information cycle and source selection in a communication studies course. A community college librarian will explain how she assesses active learning in a college skills course where most students are enrolled in pre-college English, reading, and math. This presentation reflects the diversity of ways that librarians can embrace active learning assessment. Attendees will leave with an invigorated perspective on the ability to incorporate quick and easy assessments into their instruction. Using these techniques, attendees will be able to blend in new splashes of color into their assessment through active learning.

Participants will:

  • Identify active learning exercises that can be used to assess learning in order to integrate assessment seamlessly into instruction
  • Design active learning assessments for information literacy sessions in order to evaluate student learning

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Starting from Scratch: Meaningful Integration of Information Literacy through Collaborative Course and Assignment Design
Chris Sweet and Meghan Burke (Illinois Wesleyan University)

Instruction librarians are all too familiar with well-intentioned research papers and assignments that reduce information literacy to a simplistic checklist (must include 4 peer-reviewed sources) or set of skills (use interlibrary loan, cite materials properly). Librarians and classroom faculty should recognize that information literacy cannot just be magically imparted to students through a single assignment or library instruction session. Becoming information literate requires repeated practice in a variety of contexts. How often have you wished for the opportunity to just sit down with a faculty member and start from scratch when designing an assignment –or even better- an entire course? That is precisely what the presenters have done with two sociology courses at Illinois Wesleyan University. Professor of Sociology, Meghan Burke and Information Literacy Librarian, Chris Sweet collaboratively re-designed two of Professor Burke's race and ethnic relations sociology courses. The new courses integrate information literacy concepts throughout each course. Because of the new course structure, teaching information literacy has also become a shared responsibility.

Participants will:

  • Be able to advocate for collaborative design of courses and assignments
  • Be able to explain how full integration of information literacy can enhance course goals

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Tailoring Information Literacy Instruction with International Flair: Partnering for Global Reach
Anna Kozlowska (Dickinson College)

The Global Approach Information Literacy Program at Dickinson College is designed for international students and American students who wish to study abroad, and is an innovative method of sharing information and research at a global level. The program includes:

  • Teaching information literacy sessions in foreign languages.
  • Running innovative orientation programs for international students with consideration to cultural differences and language barriers.
  • Hosting preparatory research sessions for students going abroad.
  • Maintaining ongoing communication with students working on their research projects abroad via email and Skype.
  • Cooperating with the Multilingual Writing Center by providing research assistance in composition classes for international students.
  • Providing research assistance to international scholars in their native language.
Furthermore, the program is envisioned as a way of creating engaging information literacy sessions in foreign languages and forming lasting partnerships across the institution. Many may think that multilingual information literacy sessions and global libraries are unrealistic, but considering the ubiquity of international forces in today's highly interconnected world, I am a firm believer that this is the path towards success in our profession.

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify campus opportunities for global cooperation
  • Be able to develop outreach programs for language departments, study abroad programs, and international students
  • Be able to work collaboratively with international students and students preparing to study abroad

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Talking Back(channel): TodaysMeet and Library Instruction
Jordan Moore (Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library)

TodaysMeet.com encourages instructors to "embrace the backchannel" by creating a chat room for their presentations. In this space, audience members are able to converse, pose questions, and give feedback, all of which can be seen and addressed by the presenter in real-time. Could this tool help instruction librarians in their never-ending struggle to increase audience participation and keep students from using technology for non-library purposes during classes? Or is it one more piece of technology to compete against for students' attention? In this session, instruction librarians share their experiences and lessons learned using TodaysMeet.com in the classroom.

Participants will:

  • Analyze how students use TodaysMeet to the benefit or detriment of their class
  • Know the best practices for using TodaysMeet to enrich an instruction session and keep it from becoming a distraction
  • Gain experience using TodaysMeet by engaging in a real-time chat during the presentation

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Teaching the Law & Ethics of Image Use in an Age of Appropriation & Piracy
Alexander Watkins (University of Colorado Boulder)

The legality and ethics of image use are a key component of visual literacy, but one with which students are often unfamiliar. Participants in this session will learn strategies to teach students the bounds of copyright and the power of fair use, skills they need to explore the limits of legal image use. However, what's legal under fair use is not always ethical, especially when it involves the appropriation of visuals from disempowered groups or individuals. This session will present ideas for how librarians can get students to critically engage with the consequences of their image use.

Participants will:

  • Understand the basics of image copyright and fair use, in order to teach students the critical thinking skills necessary to construct a fair use argument for their image use
  • Be introduced to the ethical implications of image use in order to teach students to use images responsibly and with sensitivity
  • Be able to design visual literacy instruction in order to engage students in activities and discussion about their image use from multiple perspectives

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Teaching to Teach: A Successful Regional Collaboration for Library Instruction Training
Sarah Young (Cornell University) and Lindsay Marlow (University of South Dakota)

This session will describe a successful program that aims to fill the gap in pedagogical training that exists between library education and professional expectations. A model for a formal, grassroots instruction training program built upon a regional collaboration will be presented. Through facilitated discussion, participants will identify their own needs for library instruction training and the local strengths and talent that can contribute to a successful collaboration. They will leave this session with the confidence to initiate similar efforts at a scale that makes sense for their professional community.

Participants will:

  • Identify those elements of a comprehensive instruction training program that promote effective teaching at various stages across the career spectrum
  • Recognize the value of professional development opportunities comparable to LILAC in order to encourage the creation of similar local academies

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


The Art of Discovery: Helping Students Find Inspiration in Unlikely Places
Anne Jumonville and Dr. Kelly Carlisle (Trinity University)

How can an "old space" like Special Collections be repurposed to meet evolving information literacy learning goals? This presentation will address ways in which a traditional library space can be reimagined as a place to engage students in affective learning at the beginning of the research process. By crafting activities for students that emphasize exploration and open-ended discovery, librarians and faculty can help students slow down and approach research more creatively. In the session, we (two librarians and a teaching faculty member) will share specific outcomes, activities, and the results of our assessments.

Participants will:

  • Understand the importance of affective learning as a part of research in order to address student information literacy learning from a more holistic perspective
  • Identify challenges and strategies for integrating affective learning experiences into instruction scenarios in order to effectively identify opportunities for affective learning in their own contexts

Intended audience: Some experience with the topic


The Art of Information: Teaching Visual Literacy with First-Year Students
Andi Beckendorf (Luther College)

January First-Year Seminars at Luther College offer an opportunity for engagement in creative exploration of a single subject. In 2013, the presenter taught "Visual Literacy and the Art of Information", in which first-year students, in the role of information consumers, practiced reading and analyzing images using the vocabulary of art, design, and critical thinking. The foundation for conversation included definitions and applications of the elements and principles of art; identification and evaluation of information sources and contexts; primary examples selected from the work of Edward Tufte and others; and concepts from Garr Reynolds' Presentation Zen Design.

The presenter will discuss course content by looking at individual and group assignments, and explain how students practiced their speaking skills by making observations and analyzing images posted to Google+, all of which served as scaffolding for the creative final project, which was an oral presentation. We will look at a range of high- and low-tech tools used during the course (including scanned material, iPad snapshots of course content, whiteboard drawings, a document camera, cartoon sketching, Google+, Prezi, Google docs and collaborative visual review for the final exam). A rubric was adapted to evaluate both the quality of the final presentation and student ability to put visual literacy principles into practice. Audience members will have an opportunity to consider how portions of the materials, techniques, tools, student exercises or the rubric from the First Year Seminar might be selectively used to introduce visual literacy into information literacy sessions from different disciplines.

Participants will:

  • Be able to select appropriate tools to incorporate visual literacy elements into teaching
  • Be able to construct assignments that combine visual and critical thinking through writing
  • Be able to assess an oral presentation for principles of visual literacy and effective speaking

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


The Art of the Win: Engaging Students in Citing Sources
William Cuthbertson and Lyda F. Ellis (University of Northern Colorado)

Butt slaps, head rubs, and end zone dances—all products of a college football team's exposure to the interactive, competitive, and high-stakes game of Citation Relay! While citation crafting is typically any student's worst nightmare, adding elements of competition and creativity reinforces core concepts and elicits unexpected enthusiasm to the task. In-class games, like Citation Relay, and other creative activities allow students to engage intellectually and enthusiastically with the topic. Discover how to create an innovative, active-learning lesson plan that rewards students for intensive focus on citation structure, formatting, and content.

Participants will:

  • Discover the benefits of competitive activities in order to enhance student engagement with difficult classroom concepts, such as citation writing
  • Discuss methods for engaging students creatively in order to build student investment in classroom activities

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


The Writing is on the Wall: Using Padlet for Whole-Class Engagement
Beth Fuchs (University of Kentucky)

Peer learning and class participation are essential components of the active learning classroom, so what can you do to promote full student engagement with your tried-and-true activities in a once-and-done information literacy session? Take them to the wall! Padlet (www.padlet.com) provides a free, multimedia-friendly wall which can be used to encourage real-time, whole-class participation and assessment. No special equipment or technical know-how required. Find out how one librarian has used Padlet to help students create memorable, collaborative artifacts of classroom learning experiences. This is student engagement as scholarly graffiti. Banksy, watch out!

Participants will:

  • Be able to contribute to a Padlet wall in order to have a better understanding of the technology's capabilities through direct individual experience
  • Be able to explain the benefits and risks of using real-time participatory technology to enhance student engagement in order to evaluate its potential for use in their own classes
  • Be able to identify at least 3 instructional situations where Padlet can be used in order to explore its use in a classroom setting

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Unifying Ideas: Building For-Credit Information Literacy Courses Around Themes to Optimize Student Learning
Elizabeth Price and Rebecca Richardson (Murray State University)

One of the problems in trying to teach our students to critically analyze and use reliable information is that they don't have enough background knowledge to do a thorough investigation - especially when it came to the typical project topics that we used for assignments - copyright, hacking, music piracy, patents and trademarks, etc. Students are adept at skimming sources to put together a bibliography, but rarely seem to read the sources or gain true insight into the topics they select. The end results are far from masterpieces. And when every student researches a different individually-selected topic, there are fewer opportunities for peer-teaching to lessen the load on instructors. At semester's end, instructors may feel discouraged and wonder what students truly learned.

To re-energize our course content and our passion for teaching, we had the students start the semester analyzing one topic to build a knowledge base for discussion and research. After working on this canvas jointly, each student did an individual or group project that branched off the central theme.

The crucial part of this approach to information literacy courses is choosing a theme. The selection must account for three significant factors: 1) Be appealing to a variety of students. 2) Be broad enough to have multiple facets for exploration. 3) Be tailored to an instructor's strengths.

The right theme - besides being beneficial to teaching and learning - can provide an additional perk as a marketing tool to attract students to the class.

Participants will:

  • Describe advantages of organizing for-credit information literacy courses around themes in order to increase student learning
  • Identify and develop themes in order to redesign their own for-credit information literacy courses

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


Users' Impressions of LibGuides: Feedback from a Student Focus Group
Rebecca Payne (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

To better understand users' perceptions of research guides created in LibGuides, librarians at the University of Wisconsin-Madison conducted a user study. The study's purpose was to gain feedback on two guides in particular, as well as guides in general, concerning their usefulness, content, usability, discoverability, and marketing. The presentation will describe the study's methods, findings, and outcomes, and how feedback was used to make improvements to the specific guides and inform general practices for creating, providing access to, and promotion of research guides. With input from attendees, the session will consider how the study's methods might be adapted for use in assessment in other libraries.

Participants will:

  • Be able to employ described research methods in assessment in their libraries
  • Be able to apply best practices for design of research guides
  • Be able to describe how assessment activities can contribute to outreach to user communities

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic


We're All In It Together: Professional Development Linking Multi-Type Libraries with Information Literacy Instruction Across One State
Cheryl Ann McCarthy and Mary MacDonald (University of Rhode Island)

Learn how two academic leaders in one state, Cheryl A. McCarthy, Professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Rhode Island, and Mary MacDonald, Professor in the University of Rhode Island Library, collaborated to present a one-state multi-type library professional development workshop sponsored by the Office of Library and Information Services. Profs. McCarthy and MacDonald created a panel of librarians from multi-type libraries to share best practices in information literacy instruction from a variety of libraries.

Learn how these librarians created a LibGuide for the workshop presentation with contributions from academic, high school, public, and special librarians to share examples of best practices teaching their library users how to succeed with their inquiry and information needs. Participants at the workshop:
1) identified best practices in Information Literacy Instruction for all types of libraries;
2) participated in roundtable discussions; and
3) discussed future opportunities to enhance and connect these valuable services across all types of libraries recognizing that we are all in it together to ensure lifelong learning for all in one state.

Learn about the two outcomes of this collaboration for sustainability and continued professional development:
1) the addition of notes to the LibGuide from participants in roundtable discussions; and
2) the formation of the Information Literacy Action Roundtable (ILART) by the Rhode Island Library Association for continued professional development and collaboration among participants.

Participants will:

  • Identify how to lead professional development across a spectrum of libraries to enhance partnerships statewide
  • Be able to refine their roles as instruction librarians with enhanced skills focused on learner-centered teaching using technology and instructional design to enhance student learning
  • Be able to collaborate with partners in all types of libraries who are committed to providing information literacy instruction to enhance the library's mission of lifelong learning

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Writing, Searching, Thinking, Learning: Cross-Training Peer Research and Writing Tutors to Maximize Student Success
Julia Glassman, Doug Worsham and Christine Holten (University of California, Los Angeles)

Any college instructor who assigns essays or research papers will tell you that writing and research are deeply intertwined. Doesn't it make sense, then, to empower writing tutors to give their peers basic guidance in research, and vice versa? With this in mind, the UCLA College Library has partnered with the UCLA Undergraduate Writing Center (UWC) to cross-train writing and research tutors.

This partnership has helped foster a dramatic re-envisioning of library space, and has been a major factor in the development of new practices like replacing the reference desk with a consultation suite (dubbed the Inquiry Space) and expanding the Library's use of student tutors alongside full-time librarians. The UWC now operates a satellite center within the Library, and the Library is expanding its offerings of research consultations in other campus spaces. Overall, this collaborative training has led to a more integrated, nuanced, and broad-reaching Library service model.

This session will introduce participants to the training program developed for research and writing tutors, assessment strategies, unexpected challenges, budget and space considerations, and other issues. Then, participants will be able to share strategies they are employing at their own libraries or begin building a similar program at their campuses.

Participants will:

  • Employ new strategies for collaborative relationships with their writing centers and other campus partners
  • Develop a research methods training program for writing tutors
  • Evaluate learning space design for composition tutoring and research assistance service

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic, Considerable experience with the topic


Zombies, Pirates, and Law Students: Creating Comics for your Academic Library
Jennifer Poggiali (Lehman College, City University of New York), Katy Kavanagh (East Carolina University) and Matt Upson (Oklahoma State University)

This panel discussion will explore how four academic librarians have created comics to promote information literacy and library services. Each presenter will discuss their projects, the various tools or methods used to create their comics, results so far, and their plans for the future. They will also discuss the different ways they've taken advantage of the comics medium to achieve their goals. Attendees will leave with tools and strategies to start their own comics project.

Participants will:

  • Be able to identify and locate a variety of free and low-cost ways to create comics in order to propose or undertake a comic project in their own library
  • Compare four ways comics have been designed to promote information literacy and library services in order to broaden their understanding of the possibilities of the format

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, Some experience with the topic