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Sessions

Interactive Workshops

Anticipatory Sets: Laying the Groundwork for Active Learning
Anne C. Deutsch (Information Program Coordinator) @ SUNY New Paltz and Brandon West (Social Sciences Librarian) @ SUNY Geneseo

As we plan instruction sessions, our attention often turns to student learning objectives, activities, and assessment. But how are we laying the groundwork for learning? Anticipatory sets engage the attention of the learner while activating existing knowledge – two crucial components of learning. They can also serve as informal pre-assessments that can help you understand students who you may not know well or at all. They provide an avenue for discussion and collaboration with teaching faculty as well. There are several different approaches to anticipatory sets that work well for information literacy instruction. One strategy is to have students perform a task that replicates a library or research concept in order to activate prior knowledge. Another possibility for generating interest or excitement at the beginning of class is to introduce an activity in a novel way. Utilizing these strategies can help set an energetic mood for the lesson that follows, help build a positive rapport between the librarian and students, and start uncovering students’ understanding of research processes. In this interactive workshop, two academic librarians with backgrounds in instructional design will describe the ways they have been able to infuse their instruction with energy, humor, and active learning to engage students. They will invite participants to exercise their creativity by having them create an anticipatory set framed by a teaching scenario.

Participants will:

  • be able to differentiate between various types of anticipatory sets and their instructional purposes in the classroom.
  • be able to describe the elements of a successful anticipatory set. be able to create anticipatory sets.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Speed Databasing: A Matchmaking Activity for Students and Library Databases
Jill Chisnell (Integrated Media and Design Librarian) and Teresa MacGregor (Director of the Library) @ Carnegie Mellon University

When your library subscribes to hundreds of databases, how do you introduce them to students in a meaningful way? A cross between online and speed dating – Speed Databasing allows students to “meet” multiple databases during one class session. Whether they find the “perfect match” for a current assignment or their “soulmate” in a database they will use throughout their academic career, Speed Databasing is an engaging and energizing approach to library resource instruction. The presenters will discuss their experiences creating and implementing this active learning exercise at their institutions and facilitate an interactive Speed Databasing round with the audience.

Participants will:

  • be able to design and execute a Speed Databasing activity to use during their own library instruction sessions

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

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Abstract

Participants will:

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Intended audience: Brand

Presentations

Abbayas, the Burj Khalifa, and Books: Expat Academic Librarians in the Middle East
Lynnette Harper (Assistant Professor, Transition Librarian) and Dr. Kristine N. Stewart (Assistant Professor, Information Literacy Coordinator) @ Zayed University

In this talk, we will discuss our experiences as two expat academic librarians in the Middle East and give suggestions on how to best support international Arab students, both academically and personally while they are in the states. We will share our students educational experience and the academic challenges they face, specifically regarding Information Literacy and the use of Libraries.

Participants will:

  • discuss Middle Eastern students educational experience and the academic challenges they face, specifically regarding Information Literacy and the use of libraries
  • identify opportunities to connect the library to Middle Eastern international students

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Creating a Data Posse
Rebecca Orozco (Faculty Engagement Librarian for the Sciences and Engineering), Tami Albin (Associate Librarian) and Karna Younger (Faculty Engagement Librarian) @ University of Kansas Libraries

The way data is captured, analyzed, communicated, and preserved within the academy is undergoing dynamic changes. In order to engage faculty and meet their data management needs, we are collaborating with the data services librarian to educate ourselves, fellow librarians, teaching faculty, and students. In this presentation, we share how we used this collaboration to develop digital learning objects for faculty to use in their courses, and to educate ourselves about data literacies. In the process, we ensured that conversations, engagement, and skill building surround data management is not seen as the sole task of one librarian, but a collective responsibility of many.

Participants will:

  • gain insight into the need for data literacies across disciplines. Attendees will acquire key vocabulary and language to launch conversations about data literacy with colleagues and teaching faculty across disciplines. Attendees will learn how to step outside of their comfort zone to collaborate with colleagues across library units to learn, develop, and strengthen their understanding of unfamiliar literacies, such as data literacies..

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth: When the data you receive is not the data you want
Savannah L Kelly (Research and Instruction Librarian) @ University of Mississippi

What do you do when the intervention you set out to measure did not make a difference, and the intervention you did not want to measure was more significant than you expected? This was the situation we found ourselves in when assessing the impact of a new video series on students’ research confidence. It was hypothesized that students who received video content in addition to a traditional face-to-face session would report higher research confidence levels than students who did not receive the video content. Not only were there negligible differences between the groups that watched the videos and those that did not, but students’ research confidence levels increased significantly – in all groups – after receiving the face-to-face instruction session. This finding was somewhat unwelcome, as we had hoped to move away from the one-shot method in favor of creating digital content. This presentation will share one librarian’s critical reflection in the face of disconfirming assessment results. All assumptions were uprooted and analyzed – from the development of the confidence scale (was it measuring what it should have?), to the content of the videos (was it too advanced?), to the timing of the videos (administered after, and not before, the one-shot?), to the statistics used to analyze the data (paired t-test or independent t-test?), and finally to the results in hand: how does one maintain a rapidly unsustainable face-to-face instruction program? Participants unfamiliar with assessing library instruction’s impact on students’ learning and affect will hear the inherent difficulties in trying to isolate and measure particular outcomes. More experienced librarians will have the opportunity to share their own challenges and solutions when confronted with unanticipated assessment results.

Participants will:

  • reflect on their own assessment results in order to determine when to accept an outcome and move forward, and when to regroup and revise the original assessment strategy

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Hold Your Horses: Staying Steady (and Staying Neutral?) in Turbulent Times
Marcia Rapchak (Director of Research and Information Skills and Instruction Librarian) and Erin Anthony (Online Learning Librarian) @ Duquesne University

This session will explore the issue of whether or not librarians should be neutral in our approach to teaching information literacy. Many students wish to take on research topics that are controversial, and we may find ourselves torn about how to work with these students in a way that respects the autonomy of the student while also combating stereotypes, injustice, and misinformation. In addition, some of us may use the Framework to teach information literacy in a way that sheds light on issues of social justice, racism, sexism, ableism, homophobia, and more. However, we may find that students push back by claiming that we are imposing our political beliefs onto them. Should we attempt to be neutral during such times? If so, how do we do so in a way that does not condone injustice? If we aren’t neutral, how do we approach teaching in a way that does not alienate students? This session will explore the implications and methods of taking a neutral approach or not. We will look at the professional and civic responsibilities of librarians and educators in higher education and consider how these can inform our approach to teaching. We will also look at how the Framework, particular Authority is Constructed and Contextual, and critical information literacy might allow us to approach IL instruction in a way that involves and respects the student while not betraying our dedication to justice. Participants will role play as students and librarians discussing research topics so that they can explore their comfort level with addressing controversial issues. Additionally, participants will be invited to discuss their perspective of the concepts raised in the session.

Participants will:

  • compare a neutral approach to teaching information literacy to an approach that emphasizes social justice
  • describe how civic and professional responsibilities impact information literacy instruction
  • use the Framework to guide students how to research controversial issues

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Leading by Letting Go: Shifting strategies for first year library instruction and the creation of an “Instructor’s Toolkit”
Laura Birkenhauer (Academic Resident Librarian) and Lindsay Miller (First Year Experience Librarian) @ Miami University Libraries and Erin Vonnahme (Humanities Librarian) @ Miami University Libraries

After a long history of jumping through hoops to meet first year instruction needs, librarians took the lead to develop a new approach to library instruction for first year composition courses. This new strategy, coupled with the creation of an online “Instructor’s Toolkit,” lightened the workload for librarians while simultaneously allowing for increasingly engaging instruction and greater faculty involvement. Breakout session presenters will detail the process involved in leading faculty to embrace a laissez-faire library instruction strategy and describe the benefits reaped from this new approach. The presentation will include a live demonstration of the online “Instructor’s Toolkit.” Session attendees will be actively engaged through structured small group discussion, brainstorming and opportunities to ask questions of presenters. Participants will walk away empowered with the tools to initiate similar shifts in their own institutions.

Participants will:

  • identify strategies for and discuss benefits of initiating changes to stereotypical first year composition library instruction
  • develop an action plan for leading similar changes in their own institutions

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Leading Horses to Water: Constructing Courses to Get Students to Drink
Dan Chibnall (STEM Librarian), Carrie Dunham-LaGree (Librarian for Digital Literacy & General Education) and Sam Becker (Campus Engagement Librarian) @ Drake University

Credit-bearing courses provide the kind of environment best suited to dig deeper into information literacy and the concepts contained in the ACRL Framework. In this presentation, three librarians will outline their experiences crafting courses and pedagogical techniques that integrate information literacy skills using non-traditional materials. Though the use of fiction and films based on real women, science fiction, and popular nonfiction, the presenters will share how they built individualized courses that meet an information literacy curriculum requirement. One of the challenges of credit-bearing information literacy courses can be the inability to provide authentic context for students. Information literacy can be a hard sell no matter how well its importance is articulated. Students who do well in courses may not understand how skills transfer outside of the artificial contexts provided. In this presentation, we will address the ways that course content can be used to provide authentic context by asking students to use non-traditional materials to consider research. We will demonstrate the way that individualized course content has impacted our design decisions, assessment, and instructional activities while still adhering to a common set of objectives.

Participants will:

  • compare methods for interpreting a standardized set of learning outcomes and the ACRL framework through the lens of unique course content.
  • recognize opportunities for incorporating non-traditional materials into their information literacy programs and courses. Identify opportunities for using popular materials to expand and enhance information literacy programs and courses.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Letting Students Do the Vetting: An Experiment in Teaching Students to Write infoPlaylists for the Library Blog
Jason Ezell (Instruction & Research Coordinator) @ Loyola University, New Orleans and Joyce Garczynski (Assistant University Librarian for Development & Communication) @ Towson University

It’s challenging to demonstrate to students the everyday importance of quality source selection. But, in the age of "fake news," it's vital that librarians tackle the challenge. In this presentation, we outline how teaching students to write “infoPlaylists” (vetted webliographies on current topics) for the library blog importantly reframes website evaluation as a socially valuable skill students can perform. We describe the infoPlaylist as a simple but innovative form which gives students’ evaluative skills an audience, offers instructors an alternative research assignment, positions the library blog as a venue between university and the wider public, and lends authenticity to library instruction. We further detail the assignment, its assessment, and the infoPlaylist’s reception.

Participants will:

  • recognize key features of the infoPlaylist as a form of research writing and as a course assignment
  • formulate ways to integrate the assignment into library instruction programs
  • explore its potential for broader library communications initiatives

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Meeting students where they are: Using assessment data to inform one-shot curriculum
Brianne Markowski (Information Literacy Librarian & Assistant Professor), Stephanie Evers (Information Literacy Librarian & Lecturer) and Lyda Fontes McCartin (Information Literacy Librarian & Associate Professor) @ University of Northern Colorado

How do students use the sources we help them find during library instruction sessions? To answer this question we scored research papers written by students enrolled in a first-year experience course to assess how well they were finding, incorporating, and citing appropriate sources. During this presentation we’ll share our assessment process, from developing and norming the rubric to using the data to inform changes to our one-shot lesson plan. We will also share preliminary assessment results following implementation of the new curriculum. Our results may inspire you to rethink the focus of your first-year instruction.

Participants will:

  • describe a process for using student papers to inform changes to one-shot curriculum
  • reflect on how a rubric assessment process could be adopted in your library

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Open this box: Leveraging the popularity of escape rooms to create an engaging library instruction session.
Amber Wilson (Head of Education and Outreach) and Jessica Riedmueller (Instructional Services Librarian) @ University of Central Arkansas

Looking for interactive ways to engage with your students? Have a knack for puzzles and problem solving? This presentation will explore the process of creating a library instruction session modeled after the popular escape room concept. This discussion will include the design and planning process, implementation strategies, lessons learned, and pulling it off with no budget and limited resources. We will also reflect on identifying partnership opportunities across campus and cultivating those relationships for future collaborations. Finally, we will examine strategies to critically assess the students’ capacity for the application of the information literacy skills learned.

Participants will:

  • learn strategies to design and implement an interactive library instruction session incorporating escape room concepts
  • anticipate challenges that may arise during the creation process and identify possible strategies to overcome them
  • develop the skills and knowledge necessary to critically assess the effectiveness of escape room-style sessions and evaluate student achievement of specific information literacy skills

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Putting the Cart Before the Horse: Creating Online Information Literacy Modules for a Reluctant Faculty
Cecelia Parks (Research and Instruction Librarian) @ University of Mississippi

Many libraries face the challenge of meeting increasing demand for information literacy instruction with decreasing library resources. This presentation explores one library’s answer to that challenge: using online modules to replace in-person instruction for a required undergraduate writing course, addressing the development of the modules and assessment of faculty perceptions of the modules. Though the modules went through several cycles of feedback and revision, a recent faculty survey showed persistent instructor reluctance to embrace online information literacy instruction in the place of in-person library instruction. This presentation examines ways to balance faculty feedback and desires with the realities of library resource constraints and concludes with a discussion of lessons learned and next steps.

Participants will:

  • be able to assess faculty responses to changes in library instruction offerings
  • be able to evaluate plans to create online information literacy instruction tools
  • be able to identify possible solutions to implement (or avoid) in facing challenges of increased demand for library instructional services

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Reading Is Research: Promoting Critical Reading Through Embedded Librarianship
Marc Bess (Instruction Librarian) @ University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Critical reading encourages students to go beyond the surface level by deeply reading, processing, and analyzing information during the research process. As such, it has been increasingly emphasized in higher education. Library instruction centered on critical reading skills not only prepares students to be more effective researchers as college students, but helps build valuable information evaluation competencies that can be transferred to the professional world. This session focuses on Reading Is Research, a collaborative instruction initiative between librarians and faculty that aims to cultivate critical reading skills through embedded librarianship. In this program, a librarian works with a faculty member to design assignments, plan library instruction sessions, and create customized digital learning objects to build critical reading skills. Reading Is Research encourages students to process and connect information from a wide variety of sources to explore high level concepts such as conflict, narrative, and perspective. By illustrating how to look beyond the most superficial aspects of information to discover how sources truly connect with one another, students are better prepared to become more efficient information analysts and creators. This session will focus on strategies for promoting critical reading through instruction, designing assignments that cultivate these vital skills, and building partnerships that position library instruction as an integral part of the curriculum.

Participants will:

  • learn how critical reading skills can be successfully cultivated through library instruction
  • learn new strategies for collaborating with faculty on library instruction initiatives
  • discover how to design assignments to build critical reading skills

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Redesigning a FYE library module: Cleveland Based Learning
Ben Richards (Busienss & Communication Librarian) @ Cleveland State University

"After several years of consistently offering the same one-shot session and library assignment in the First Year Experience seminar, feedback from several stakeholders in the course indicated there was a need for something fresh. Working with First Year Experience staff and a planning committee, two librarians worked together to propose a new lesson plan that would retain information literacy learning objectives while also incorporating elements of civic engagement, exploration of the areas surrounding campus, and local history, situating research in the context of problem solving. Throughout the FYE course, students receive scaffolded instruction regarding the assignment. The final product is a group presentation regarding their research question and a self-reflection writing assignment. The lesson includes information literacy outcomes informed by the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education. . At risk was losing a relatively straightforward and well-established lesson and replacing it with something more open-ended. There were both successes and lessons to be learned from planning and implementing the new lesson plan. The session will inform attendees about what led to the course redesign, the planning and implementation process, and observations and outcomes from the 1st year of using the new lesson. Advice and considerations for librarians and staff considering a similar undertaking will be provided, as well as associated lesson plans and course support materials that can be reused or modified. "

Participants will:

  • assess the utility of a similar FYE library module at their institution
  • reflect on the process of redesigning a FYE library module

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Research as a Resume Builder: Delivering a Career-focused Information Literacy Certificate Program
Megan Blauvelt Heuer (Head of Information Literacy) @ Southern Methodist University

While there are many information literacy badging programs out there, most focus on general library and academic research. The Temerlin Information Literacy Certificate Program at Southern Methodist University was created in response to employers’ complaints about the lack of research skills for new hires in the field of advertising. This session will cover the benefits and challenges of creating a certificate program that focuses on a specific discipline and that seeks to teach career competencies as well as ideas for making a similar program successful. Topics include identifying learning goals, developing legitimacy with students, faculty, and employers, and matching program goals to appropriate assessment. Attendees will have a chance to discuss how similar ideas could be enacted at their institutions and will come away with ideas and supporting materials for helping students address real world information problems.

Participants will:

  • identify career-focused information literacy goals for a certificate program
  • recognize methods for gaining legitimacy and buy-in from students, faculty, and employers
  • match certificate program goals with appropriate assessment methods

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Running Mates: An Integrated Information Literacy and STEM Curriculum
Bethany Havas (Reference & Instruction Librarian) and Adrienne Button Harmer (Instruction Coordinator and Assistant Department Head) @ Georgia Gwinnett College

Library and STEM faculty at Georgia Gwinnett College have worked together for eight years to embed information literacy into the required introductory STEM classes for all our STEM majors. We will demonstrate how we use the ADDIE model to inform our practice: collaborative instructional design, interventions and workshops, pre-tests, tutorials, in-class activities, and methods of student assessment and reflection. We highlight our assessment findings and their impact on our continuing efforts and future collaboration, particularly as our chemistry program includes the library faculty in developing an exciting new STEM project for the 2017-2018 academic year.

Participants will:

  • determine how the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy can be adopted and adapted to integrate information literacy into the STEM curriculum
  • describe and apply the ADDIE design model to their own collaborative instructional design efforts

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Sowing accessibility in learning objects so users can reap the educational rewards
Katie Stewart (Distance Education Librarian and Erica Getts (Distance Education Librarian) @ Johns Hopkins University

The implementation of learning objects has increasingly become a top priority for instruction librarians. In the effort to design these materials, concepts such as active learning and student engagement are usually at the forefront of the creation process. While interactive media such as tutorials, infographics, and concept maps have been known to achieve higher levels of engagement, the accessibility of these objects is often overlooked. Users with vision loss, hearing impairment, and other disabilities may not be able to experience the materials in the same way as others, potentially preventing them from learning altogether. In this session, attendees will (re)visit the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 with respect to the creation of various learning objects. The presenters will discuss their efforts to critically evaluate their own preexisting materials and best practices for the creation of new materials in order to provide an equally positive learning experience to all users.

Participants will:

  • identify best practices for accessibility that can be incorporated into the development of future learning objects
  • recognize specific changes that can be made to improve the accessibility of existing learning objects

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

A Strong Start Out of the Gate! Building Student Engagement Before Class Begins
Lindy Scripps-Hoekstra (Liberal Arts Liaison Librarian) @ Grand Valley State University

It’s ten minutes before the start of your instruction session, the students are trickling in and you are… fiddling with the computer? Shuffling papers? Making small talk with the professor? Rather than leaving students with nothing to do but thumb through their phones, take advantage of this time to build student engagement. Long known to K-12 educators as “bellwork,” learn how to enhance your instruction by developing activities that spark student interest before the start of a session. This presentation will detail and demonstrate strategies designed to activate prior knowledge, facilitate self-assessment, and build rapport. Attendees will build collections of sample activities to help them make the most out of every minute with students.

Participants will:

  • be able to identify the pedagogical purpose of engaging students and setting the tone in the minutes leading up the start of an instructional session
  • be able to incorporate short activities to prior to instructional sessions by creating a collection of samples and participating in three select examples

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Teach the Teachers, Reach the Students: Badging for Digital Citizenship
Trudi E. Jacobson (Head, Information Literacy Department), Kelsey O'Brien (Information Literacy Librarian) @ University at Albany, SUNY and Michele Forte (Assistant Professor) @ SUNY Empire State College

Librarians and faculty members from three institutions collaborated to adapt a metaliteracy Digital Citizen badge for use with graduate literacy education students. The multi-faceted goal is not only for these students to affirm their roles as digital citizens, but also to actively teach and model such citizenship to their prospective students. This grant-funded project, which adapts content from an existing metaliteracy badging system, incorporates mechanisms to encourage a community of users, and serves as a model for collaborations with faculty across various disciplines. In this session, project collaborators will briefly introduce metaliteracy (metaliteracy.org), provide an overview of the badging system (metaliteracybadges.org), and discuss the components added for this project, including rubrics for assessment, and mechanisms that worked well for collaborating. We are not only concerned with collaboration within the grant team; we also built components that will encourage educators to create open access learning objects for an Educators Corner and an Educators Conference. Drawing from expertise as co-creators and researchers in initiatives such as the new ACRL Information Literacy Framework and the Connecting Credentials (connectingcredentials.org) and Global Learning Qualifications Frameworks (funded by the Lumina Foundation), we have worked together to create a robust resource that will be available to every SUNY institution, and, ultimately, to interested institutions beyond SUNY. We encourage participants to actively engage in the presentation by contributing ideas for badging opportunities based on your own professional development and curricular goals to an open forum in the Educators Corner.

Participants will:

  • recognize the potential for digital badging in teaching students Identify the key components that characterize this successful collaboration
  • assess the potential application of these collaborative elements to their institution

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

“This Horse Race is Rigged!” Teaching Popular Source Evaluation in an Era of Fake News, Post-Truth, and Confirmation Bias
Lane Wilkinson (Director of Library Instruction) @ University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

The role of fake and misleading news in influencing public opinion is a hot topic and librarians are right at the front lines, teaching students how to distinguish information from misinformation. Yet, information literacy concepts such as credibility, authority, and reliability are often strained under the weight of partisan skepticism of traditionally credible sources. Paradoxically, some of our students who are most committed to rejecting traditional markers of trustworthiness are also among our most information literate students. This presentation will look at the psychology of how we decide to trust information sources and will present a novel approach to addressing fake news, confirmation bias, and the student who says, “the mainstream media is rigged!”

Participants will:

  • be able to understand how learners naturally establish the trustworthiness of information sources in order to better construct information literacy lessons plans.
  • be able to understand how concepts of credibility, authority, and reliability are analyzed in other disciplines in order to add interdisciplinary approaches to information literacy curriculum design.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic.

What’s a jockey without a horse? Librarians and faculty building community together around the Framework
Rachel Stott (Teaching and Learning Librarian) @ University of Colorado Denver - Auraria Library

What will the disciplinary faculty teaching information literacy courses think of all this? That’s the question Old Dominion University librarians often circled back to as we grappled with how the ACRL Framework fit into ODU's information literacy general education learning outcomes. To help arrive at a shared understanding of how the Framework plays into individual and programmatic pedagogy, we organized a series of “casual conversations” around the Framework. Through a mix of individual reflection, small group work, and large group discussion, both faculty and librarians laid out the ways we currently address the Frames in our instruction and ways we may improve or make changes to our approach. This presentation will solicit participant examples of work done with faculty around the Framework; outline the planning and marketing process for organizing the workshop series; provide the questions and activities used in each workshop; share the ideas, themes, and collaborations that resulted from the workshop series; provide time for participants to think about and share steps they may take to foster faculty engagement around the Framework at their own institutions; and offer time for questions.

Participants will:

  • recognize the value of including faculty in discussions about using the Framework in information literacy instruction
  • identify strategies for leading faculty outreach regarding the Framework
  • build collaborative communities with faculty and other campus stakeholders around information literacy

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

When to Plant Heirlooms and When to Plant Hybrids: Unearthing Instruction Librarians’ Motivations for Adopting New Practices
Elizabeth Galoozis (Information Literacy & Educational Technology Librarian) @ University of Southern California

"What motivates librarians to try new things in information literacy instruction? Why do some of us try everything new that comes along, while others stick to familiar methods (and some of us live in the middle)? In this session, I’ll present the preliminary results of a study that attempts to answer this question. The study involved 13 in-depth interviews with academic librarians at institutions in the Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA). Study participants were asked about a range of practices and habits, from using different kinds of examples in teaching to incorporating new theories into their instruction. In a preliminary analysis of the results, motivations for seeking out and adopting new practices, as well as other influencing factors, have been identified. Factors such as the structure of an information literacy program, individual reflection practices, and institutional values emerged as themes. This presentation will focus on how these findings can be put into practice by participants, both as individual teachers and as coordinators or other kinds of influencers on others’ instructional practices. We will also discuss attitudes toward adopting new practices, the question of whether trying new things is inherently good, and how all of these interact in teaching communities of practice."

Participants will:

  • discuss common influences on and barriers to adopting new practices in information literacy instruction Develop strategies for encouraging the adoption of new practices in their libraries and for themselves

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Winning your instructional spurs: How academic librarians transform from information experts to expert educators
Amanda Nichols Hess (eLearning, Instructional Technology, and Education Librarian) @ Oakland University

Do academic librarians transform from seeing themselves as information experts to postsecondary educators? If so, how does this change happen -- what facilitates it, and what does the process look like? In this presentation, I will share data collected from a broad survey of academic librarians whose work focuses on instruction on how -- and indeed whether -- they have developed perceptions of their roles as postsecondary educators. From these data in aggregate, I will propose key takeaways for our professional practices and learning offerings. The themes gleaned from these data can help individual academic librarians identify factors for developing their identities as educators, provide guidance to library administrators seeking to foster environments where librarians can hone their perspectives about teaching, and assist graduate faculty in designing library education where students must reflect on how being a postsecondary educator fits into their chosen career. In this presentation, I will include:

  • An introduction of the problem and the research questions;
  • A discussion of Jack Mezirow's transformative learning theory, and application of this theory to academic librarians’ teaching identity development;
  • Sharing of the data collection instrument, procedures, and analysis;
  • A presentation of aggregate data with emphasis on the important ideas and questions that emerge from the data;
  • A discussion of how we can apply these takeaways in a variety of instances and settings; and
  • Time for questions / discussion.

Participants will:

  • be able to summarize the results of a large-scale survey of academic librarians’ experiences with transformative learning theory and perspective transformation in relation to their identities as educators
  • be able to explain the key concepts of Jack Mezirow’s transformative learning theory
  • be able to identify how these survey results can be applied or considered in their own work as educators or in their own institution

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Title
Author1 @ Institution

Abstract

Participants will:

  • be

Intended audience: Brand