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Sessions

Interactive Workshops

Anticipatory Sets: Laying the Groundwork for Active Learning
Anne C. Deutsch (Information Program Coordinator) @ SUNY New Paltz and Brandon West (Social Sciences Librarian) @ SUNY Geneseo

As we plan instruction sessions, our attention often turns to student learning objectives, activities, and assessment. But how are we laying the groundwork for learning? Anticipatory sets engage the attention of the learner while activating existing knowledge – two crucial components of learning. They can also serve as informal pre-assessments that can help you understand students who you may not know well or at all. They provide an avenue for discussion and collaboration with teaching faculty as well.

There are several different approaches to anticipatory sets that work well for information literacy instruction. One strategy is to have students perform a task that replicates a library or research concept in order to activate prior knowledge. Another possibility for generating interest or excitement at the beginning of class is to introduce an activity in a novel way. Utilizing these strategies can help set an energetic mood for the lesson that follows, help build a positive rapport between the librarian and students, and start uncovering students’ understanding of research processes.

In this interactive workshop, two academic librarians with backgrounds in instructional design will describe the ways they have been able to infuse their instruction with energy, humor, and active learning to engage students. They will invite participants to exercise their creativity by having them create an anticipatory set framed by a teaching scenario.

Participants will:

  • be able to differentiate between various types of anticipatory sets and their instructional purposes in the classroom.
  • be able to describe the elements of a successful anticipatory set.
  • be able to create anticipatory sets.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Are You Fluent in Composition and Rhetoric? Speaking the Language of Our Riding Partners
Amy Cooper White (Learning Services and Curriculum Design Librarian) @ Penn State

Composition instructors and librarians frequently ride together in their quest to produce information literate students. However, the ride can get bumpy when communication breaks down. This interactive workshop, taught by a librarian who is also a composition instructor, will help participants learn the language of Composition and Rhetoric so that the conversations that surround library instruction can be more effective. During this interactive workshop, participants will gain fluency in two major rhetorical concepts, the rhetorical situation and the means of persuasion, along with associated vocabulary. The first part of the session will be a mini-language class with an opportunity to practice new vocabulary through a group exercise. Following this, participants will analyze an actual assignment to see how composition instructors use this vocabulary to frame the role of research in writing. The session will conclude with an opportunity to reflect on using rhetorical language in conversations with composition instructors.

Participants will:

  • gain fluency in two major rhetorical concepts along with associated vocabulary in order to speak the language of common teaching partners.
  • analyze an assignment description in order to see how rhetorical language frames the role of research in a composition class.
  • identify opportunities to use rhetorical language in order to frame library instruction in terms that resonate with composition instructors.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Breaking New Ground with Old Plows: Revitalizing Low-Tech Library Instruction Tools that (sometimes) Enable Learners to Grow and Flourish
Terrence Bennett (Business / Economics Librarian) @ The College of New Jersey and Amelia Landenberger (Outreach Librarian) @ University of Kentucky Law Library

Librarians are generally willing to embrace new technologies, and can adapt their instruction to align with the evolving expectations of students. Amidst widespread emphasis on high-tech teaching tools, librarians may seek novelty in an unlikely place: the past.

Instruction techniques that could seem old-fashioned to librarians may hold retro appeal for students. These methods need not replace technology, but can be appropriately integrated as an engaging complement to high-tech instruction. Version 7.2 of the latest teaching application can coexist with version 1.0 of the 3x5-inch notecard.

The facilitators of this workshop have identified low-tech teaching tools that promote interactive learning. These tools disrupt the expectations of passive learners and repurpose old techniques to suit modern audiences. Intended for all instruction librarians, this workshop will be especially useful to those who are eager to try new-to-them teaching techniques, but who may feel that gaining buy-in from learners is holding them back. The facilitators will first engage attendees with brief examples of low-tech exercises that support library instruction, and discuss the successes (and failures) that they’ve encountered when employing these techniques with learners in business and law. Attendees will experience how these deceptively simple instruction exercises can lead students to deeper comprehension of specific learning outcomes. Workshop participants will then be guided through some exercises in developing low-tech, high-impact instruction techniques appropriate for learners in their own academic disciplines. Participants will also have the opportunity to share insights they may have already gained from using their own low-tech tools and techniques.

Participants will:

  • evaluate and compare the successes and failures of low-tech classroom exercises in library instruction sessions, in order to recognize how and when these tools and techniques can be successfully integrated into library instruction.
  • analyze the use of low-tech tools in library instruction in order to assess the impact of these tools in inspiring a more tangible connection to the desired learning outcomes.
  • design and construct low-tech, high-impact exercises suitable for library instruction in their own academic areas, in order to demonstrate how these tools can be used to increase engagement during instruction.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Engaging the ACRL Framework Through Short Stories and Drawing
David J. Brier (Social Sciences Librarian) and Vickery Kaye Lebbin (Social Sciences Librarian) @ University of Hawaii at Manoa

Following the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, this workshop supports the contention that good information literacy instruction is more than teaching students how to find information for their assignments in an expeditious manner. Librarians should attempt to design assignments that foster enhanced engagement with information literacy concepts. This requires teaching methods that encourage students to think about content in new ways. Short stories and drawing are two excellent lo-fi teaching methods that can foster this enhanced engagement with information literacy concepts. Short stories offer a starting place for more complex thinking about the purpose of information literacy and are a wonderful tool to inspire students to acquire the attitudes necessary for broad, creative thinking and lifelong intellectual behaviors. Short stories stimulate the imagination, give meaning to abstract concepts, aid memory, make learning fun, and are time efficient. Drawing offers an opportunity to explore student images, an often-missed dimension of instruction. Drawing enables librarians to clarify, reinforce, challenge, or change the pictures in students’ heads that underpin their understandings of library instruction and information literacy. This workshop will introduce these two teaching methods, provide examples of their use, and highlight the benefits and challenges. Attendees will work in small groups on a short story assignment and a drawing assignment. The presenters have published on this topic including a 2016 book Teaching Information Literacy through Short Stories and a 2014 Reference Services Review article Learning Information Literacy through Drawing.

Participants will:

  • be able to describe the opportunities and challenges of short story and drawing activities in library instruction workshops.
  • be able to use short stories and drawing to create assignments based on the ACRL Framework.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Framing Information Literacy with the Art of Debate
Maria R. Barefoot (Information Literacy Librarian) @ Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Debate has a long history in education and can be a successful teaching tool in the exploration of information literacy, as well. Writing debate prompts that utilize lived experiences can encourage students to view concepts in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy as an extension of their daily lives. Students who engage in debate learn the skills of finding and evaluating information, but will also learn how to use that evidence in constructive arguments. Attendees will explore a variety of debate formats, how those formats can be employed in library classrooms, and evaluation techniques for in-person and online learning.

Participants will:

  • develop debate prompts that illustrate one or more of the ACRL Frames for Information Literacy
  • learn to evaluate student debates
  • learn to facilitate information literacy debates in a variety of library settings

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Getting to the Root of the Matter: Talking through our Failures to Foster Innovation
Sarah Laleman Ward (Outreach & Instruction Librarian) and Stephanie Margolin (Instructional Design Librarian) @ Hunter College - CUNY

Are you ready to talk about your failures as an instruction librarian? We encourage our students to try, fail, and try again, learning from their previous efforts. But it can be uncomfortable to reflect on our own failures. Let’s get to work examining them in a supportive environment using active learning strategies. Social science research about failure and growth mindset suggests that failure is a necessary step toward learning and innovation. The presenters will begin this workshop by sharing some of our own instructional failures with the group. Then, through a series of guided activities driven by the participants’ experiences, we will provide the time and space to critically examine our work as instruction librarians while sharing with and receiving feedback from colleagues. We will invite you to reflect on an instructional failure of your own, examining your expectations in contrast to what actually happened. We will then ask you to probe your understanding of the way(s) your lesson failed in collaboration with other participants. At the workshop’s conclusion, participants will be prepared to re-frame their own failures as opportunities for growth and change, and will leave with at least one idea for an innovation built on a previous failure. So let’s explore our teaching failures together, re-framing and recreating them into fruitful learning experiences. Will we fail? Join us to find out.

Participants will:

  • discuss ways in which instructional “failures” can be re-framed as learning opportunities in their own instructional practice.
  • propose one idea for an innovation that builds upon a previous failure.
  • re-examine their own instructional successes and failures with a critical new eye.

Intended audience: At least some experience with the topic

“Hay Library Instruction Teams!” Pony Up Your Activities and Corral Your Curriculum
Natalie Bennett (Online Services Librarian) and Lane Wilkinson (Director of Library Instruction) @ University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Wondering how to adopt your curriculum to new learning outcomes? Worried the new Framework makes old lesson plans unusable or that individual teaching styles won’t fit? Don’t send your old lesson plans to the glue factory! Bring your own lesson plan or activity to this interactive workshop and learn how a team of library instructors can use collaborative peer-review, standardization, and modular design to remap existing activities to new outcomes, while at the same time encouraging individual teaching styles to flourish.

Participants will:

  • be able to use a team process for vetting classroom activities or lesson plans in order to remap existing curriculum to new learning outcomes.
  • gain experience with accommodating individual librarian teaching styles within a standard curriculum in order to improve teamwork and team enthusiasm.
  • Bonus outcome: Participants will see many new classroom activities that they might want to try out in classes in the future.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Increase Your Yield: Scaffolding Outreach using Curriculum Mapping
Sarah LeMire (First Year Experience and Outreach Librarian) and Stephanie Graves (Director of Learning and Outreach) @ Texas A&M University

Outreach events can be a powerful tool for increasing the reach of instruction. Outreach serves the important function of orienting students to library resources, a necessary goal for information literacy to take root. However, libraries often approach each outreach events as separate tasks. In this workshop, librarians with outreach and instruction responsibilities will walk librarians through the process of applying curriculum mapping techniques to create a scaffolded library outreach program that connects to instruction programming. By mapping the terrain between disparate outreach and instruction events, librarians can build stronger relationships with students, increase impact, avoid repetitiveness, and strengthen instruction.

Participants will:

  • identify the primary elements of curriculum mapping in order to apply the approach to outreach programming.
  • examine outreach activities, learning objectives and audiences in order to find commonalities, duplications, and areas of shared impact.
  • create an Outreach Map in order to apply the mapping technique.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

The Largest Horse In the Race: Using Mindfulness to Create an Inclusive, Student-centered Classroom/Library Session
Kristen Mastel (Outreach & Instruction Librarian) and Amy Riegelman (Social Sciences Librarian) @ University of Minnesota

The past election cycle brought up many feelings of division and intolerance. Following this divisive election, mindfulness approaches can help our students and colleagues move beyond gritting the bit and develop positive strategies for difficult conversations in the classroom and support student learning through reflection to work together toward a campus climate of inclusion. We know using the library supports student success and retention thus we need to ensure our classrooms are inclusive for everyone, including traditionally underrepresented groups, and mindfulness is one way to do this.

Contemplative pedagogy can help us create an inclusive classroom (unlike the Derby which has only featured three fillies) to discuss power inequities, eco chambers within news sources such as Facebook, Twitter and Google, the rise of fake news and lack of critical thinking when reposting, and other topics related to all the ACRL Framework. As a practitioner of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, one learns to approach situations and experiences with a beginner’s mind which helps to understand the liminal space and knowledge barriers our students are experiencing. This workshop will allow time to experience mindfulness-based activities based on the work of Dr. Rhonda Magee and Jon Kabat-Zinn. The presenters will share their personal experiences with self-care (e.g., meditation, paying attention to inner dialogue and physiological response, incremental goals).

Participants will:

  • understand core concepts to contemplative pedagogy.
  • become aware of the benefits of mindfulness activities in teaching the ACRL Framework.
  • understand how contemplative pedagogy can help move the campus climate towards inclusion.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Laying the Groundwork for a Community of Practice: Supporting Innovation through Diverse Perspectives
Nicole E. Brown (Multidisciplinary Instruction Librarian) and Marybeth McCartin (Instructional Services Librarian) @ New York University

Learning is inherently social, yet teachers often work in isolation as they seek to grow in their practice. Genuine growth results from taking risks and withstanding failure: stepping outside our comfort zone and confronting our insecurities. Introducing innovation into our teaching practice can be scary for these reasons, and a supportive community can make all the difference. Communities of practice can help instruction librarians ensure ongoing professional development through the dialogic process of colleagues in conversation. But, this model can be a risky endeavor because the organic, non-hierarchical, and informal tone contrasts with traditional professional development modes. In this interactive workshop, participants will engage in directed activities such as reflective writing about professional learning experiences and practicing community-building exercises. Facilitators will guide participants through outlining a plan for a professional development event at their library that leverages social learning and respects differences in organizational climates. Participants will reflect on, select, and apply components of a community of practice that work for those who teach in their libraries, and will return to their institutions with strategies for engaging colleagues in informal learning, building trust through inclusiveness, and laying the groundwork for learning about teaching in their organizations.

Participants will:

  • discover social learning theories to apply toward cultivating a community of practice for teaching librarians.
  • identify diverse partners for a community of practice to support teaching and learning.
  • reflect on previous learning experiences to identify new possibilities to support professional development and innovation.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Library Lost in Translation: Diversifying our Approach to Strengthen Information Literacy Skills in International Students
Kimberly D. Hoffman (Department Head, Outreach, Learning, and Research Services) and Mantra Roy (Humanities Outreach Librarian) @ University of Rochester

Themselves past foreign students requiring to use the library in countries of study, the two speakers remember the limited knowledge and confusion over how best to use a library that was unlike others they had experienced. Now, as librarians at a university where international student enrollment continues to grow on an annual basis, the speakers’ minds turn to ways in which they can lessen confusion for students who are unfamiliar with all that an American university library has to offer or how to begin asking the questions that can lead students to a path of success.

Through use of role play, small group experience, and critical reflection, participants will wear the hats of international students and explore library websites of foreign institutions to consider the following: How is the website laid out; What terminology is used; What services are offered? If they were a student navigating within this foreign library, could they accomplish their research goals? After reflecting upon the key pain points, participants consider what makes sense, what doesn’t, and how to possibly improve the learning experience. Now, as librarians back in their daily roles, participants consider and discuss what their library websites and services must look like to their international populations. Together, librarians will explore and share new directions for marketing, providing, and explaining information literacy skills that are tailored to diverse groups of students. In doing so, librarians can help their students move from confusion and isolation to information literacy and research success.

Participants will:

  • situate themselves as international students in order to identify the ways in which students at foreign libraries access and understand services, policies, and resources
  • identify the gaps in international students’ preparation of how an American library functions in order to tailor information literacy/library instruction in effective ways
  • design one change they will make in the way they present information to international students in order to take action upon return to their home institutions

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Listening and Learning from Students: Interviewing Students about the Intersections of Research, Writing and Technology
Sarah Wagner (Information Services and Instruction Librarian), Ann Marshall (Information Services and Instruction Librarian) and Kristine Frye (Coordinator of Composition, Communication, and Supplemental Instruction) @ Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne

As professional educators, the experience of a novice writer and researcher is often lost, and librarians and teaching faculty alike struggle to bridge the gap between inexperience and expertise. In this interactive session, participants will have the opportunity to practice skills for interviewing students as a strategy to gain a depth of perspective not readily available through other methods. In particular, we will explore how digital technologies impact students’ academic research and writing, and the ways in which technologies might either enhance student work, create barriers to, or even transform the research and writing process. Attendees will be invited to reflect on their own experience with technology and then to participate in role-playing as interviewers and student interviewees. Finally, the presenters will share preliminary findings from interviews with students and will facilitate audience discussion about the role of technology in the writing and research process. The session is based upon a collaboration between two librarians and an English composition instructor who is also the coordinator of the university writing center.

Participants will:

  • experience open-ended interviewing and imagine a range of responses from students.
  • craft interview questions to obtain meaningful insights into students’ research and writing practices.
  • reflect on the role digital technologies play in students’ experience of research and writing.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Making Information Literacy More Accessible through Universal Design for Learning
Brian Sullivan (Education Librarian) and Malia Willey (Humanities Librarian) @ James Madison University

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) can make information literacy more accessible for diverse learners through inclusive instructional design. This interactive workshop will focus on incorporating UDL into information literacy instruction. We will introduce the background and educational practices related to universal design. Participants will redesign common information literacy instruction scenarios using UDL guidelines to provide students with multiple means of representation, action and expression, and engagement. Librarians can further empower students of all abilities with the intentional application of UDL.

Participants will:

  • be able to apply UDL guidelines to information literacy instruction.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Sowing What You Want to Reap: Selecting Assessment Tools that Can Answer Your Questions
April Cunningham (Information Literacy/Instruction Librarian) @ Palomar College

In this interactive workshop you’ll analyze sample results-reports from rubrics and tests. We know that investing in a large-scale assessment method that does not strike the right balance can result in lost time and squandered trust. So this session will provide you with valuable practice evaluating assessment tools in terms of how you will be able to use the reports and ensure that the results do not just sit on the shelf. Assessments are only as good as the decisions they help us to make.

Participants will:

  • evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the results available from different types of large-scale information literacy assessments
  • create criteria for judging the usefulness of results generated by large-scale assessments

Intended audience: At least some experience with the topic

Speed Databasing: A Matchmaking Activity for Students and Library Databases
Jill Chisnell (Integrated Media and Design Librarian) @ Carnegie Mellon University and Teresa MacGregor (Director of the Library) @ Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

When your library subscribes to hundreds of databases, how do you introduce them to students in a meaningful way? A cross between online and speed dating – Speed Databasing allows students to “meet” multiple databases during one class session. Whether they find the “perfect match” for a current assignment or their “soulmate” in a database they will use throughout their academic career, Speed Databasing is an engaging and energizing approach to library resource instruction. The presenters will discuss their experiences creating and implementing this active learning exercise at their institutions and facilitate an interactive Speed Databasing round with the audience.

Participants will:

  • be able to design and execute a Speed Databasing activity to use during their own library instruction sessions

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Translation, Negotiation, Strategy: Shared Ownership of the One-Shot Agenda
Linda Miles (Librarian/Asst. Professor) and Haruko Yamauchi (Library Teaching Coordinator/Asst. Professor) @ Hostos Community College - CUNY

This workshop will spark creative thinking about a persistent challenge: how to negotiate with faculty whose goals, priorities, and conception of information literacy differ from our own, in order to lay a foundation for co-ownership of the student learning agenda. Using the ACRL Framework as an organizing principle, the workshop will engage participants in an improvised role play. Each participant will be assigned the role of either librarian or non-library faculty member in a specific context and with a particular agenda at the start, and must work together in pairs to come to agreement on student learning objectives and the main activity of a one-shot research workshop.

Improvising from the point of view of an assumed character, within the context of a relatable scenario, will offer a slight distance that will enable participants to take a fresh look at goals presented by non-library partners as well as strategies for expressing one’s own agenda. Post-activity debriefing will focus on insights gained, connections to real-life collaborations, and reflections on the experience of taking on a character whose perspective may or may not align with their own. Participants will discuss how they identified commonalities between the two perspectives to build a shared understanding of student learning, and how the “librarians” managed to strategically express their own perspective to move the pair toward co-ownership of the student learning agenda.

Participants will:

  • be able to analyze classroom professors’ language about student assignments and needs in order to identify commonalities between classroom professor and librarian perspectives and the Framework for Information Literacy.
  • be able to strategically express their own educational agendas for classes in order to negotiate with classroom professors about specific learning goals for information literacy one-shot sessions.
  • be able to facilitate development of a shared understanding in order to lay a foundation for co-ownership of the student learning agenda.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Writing Alone? Not Furlong!
Heather Johnson (Research and Education Librarian) and Katie Harding (Physical Sciences Librarian) @ Dartmouth College

Successfully writing a thesis or manuscript requires substantial time and skills many writers may lack. A writer’s retreat provides students, postdocs, and faculty with guidance from an experienced writer in their discipline, skill-building activities, protected writing time, and a supportive community of their peers. In this interactive session, groups of participants will work on a case study to develop a writer’s retreat proposal and event program. Participants will explore a framework they can use to design a writing retreat for their specific audience. This workshop is intended for anyone who has identified an unmet need for writing support.

Participants will:

  • communicate the value of a writer’s retreat to campus partners and prospective participants
  • apply a framework to design a writer’s retreat that meets the needs of a defined user group

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Presentations

Abbayas, the Burj Khalifa, and Books: Expat Academic Librarians in the Middle East
Lynnette Harper (Assistant Professor, Transition Librarian) and Dr. Kristine N. Stewart (Assistant Professor, Information Literacy Coordinator) @ Zayed University

In this talk, we will discuss our experiences as two expat academic librarians in the Middle East and give suggestions on how to best support international Arab students, both academically and personally while they are in the states. We will share our students educational experience and the academic challenges they face, specifically regarding Information Literacy and the use of Libraries.

Participants will:

  • discuss Middle Eastern students educational experience and the academic challenges they face, specifically regarding Information Literacy and the use of libraries
  • identify opportunities to connect the library to Middle Eastern international students

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Adopting a Common Language: Using the Framework to Market Your Information Literacy Program to Faculty
Sarah Steele (Associate Dean of the Library, Head of Research & Instruction Services), Elizabeth Dobbins (Reference & Online Instruction Librarian), Brooke Taxakis (Reference & Instruction Librarian) and Steve Bahnaman (Reference and Electronic Resources Librarian) @ Campbell University

Wondering how to take the reins and communicate the Framework to stakeholders so that you can move forward with your instructional program? In this session, uncover a plan for using Framework language and graphics to market your information fluency program to faculty. Learn how one institution, fueled by faculty enthusiasm, has used the Framework to design an interactive website communicating their library’s Information Fluency Plan. Take home an example of a faculty resource handout introducing the Framework. Hear an example of a recent upper-level instructional partnership. Enter a drawing to win a classroom set of posters inspired by the Framework.

Participants will:

  • consider how the Framework could be used as a marketing tool at their university in order to better communicate their library instruction program to faculty.
  • recognize why faculty may be attracted to Framework language.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Antiracist Pedagogy in the Information Literacy Classroom: Techniques to Foster Transformative Learning
Melissa Kalpin Prescott (Associate Professor and Research Librarian) @ St. Cloud State University

Creating a classroom community that is conducive to transformative learning can be extremely difficult, especially within the one-shot instruction model. In this session we will examine how antiracist pedagogy can be used to foster classroom community that encourages critical reflection on issues of power and privilege related to information production, access, and use. Participants will come away with ideas for designing class activities that reflect antiracist values and teaching methods. They will also have the opportunity to create individual action plans to assist them in the ongoing personal reflection that is necessary for effective antiracist work.

Participants will:

  • develop strategies for incorporating antiracist pedagogy in library instruction.
  • formulate personal goals for reflection on social position and intentional antiracist work.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic At least some experience with the topic

Beyond Library Show and Tell: Designing Collaborative Learning Experiences for Peer Educators
Erica Schattle (Outreach & Assessment Librarian) and Dianne N. Brown (Social Sciences Research & Instruction Librarian) @ Tufts University

Do your campus partners expect you to train their students with a 10-minute library show and tell? Are you looking for strategies to turn cooperative relationships into true collaborations? Librarians can design applied active learning experiences that help students in leadership positions see the relevance of the library. Recognizing students as practitioners in the context of their work as peer educators helps them to develop agency and legitimize their practice. Our session will present a case study of two collaborations for students working at an Academic Resource Center. Attendees will develop strategies for designing learning experiences for peer educators at their own institutions.

Participants will:

  • identify key campus partners with the potential for advancing collaborative relationships.
  • discuss strategies for incorporating innovative pedagogies that empower students as practitioners.
  • assess opportunities to design collaborative learning experiences for peer educators.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Bridge to Success: Developing Library Services for Transfer Students
Margaret N. Gregor (Instructional Materials Center Coordinator) and Kelly R. McBride (Information Literacy and Instruction Coordinator) @ Appalachian State University

Have you considered the role that librarians play in ensuring the success of transfer students, a growing population in four-year institutions? Have you collaborated with other campus units to identify and meet the needs of your transfer population? At Appalachian State University librarians are recognized as making valuable contributions to the transfer student experience. This was not a process that occurred quickly and it is still in development. We have initiated a number of library services and outreach efforts targeting this population. In addition, we are identifying their information seeking skills so that we can design a sustainable model of information literacy instruction for them. We have learned that effective collaboration between librarians, academic departments, offices of transfer services, and enrollment management offices is the bridge that enhances transfer student success. Come to our session to learn what librarians can do at your institution to work with this important student population.

Participants will:

  • be introduced to the role of libraries in the transfer student experience in order to gain an understanding of the contributions that libraries can make.
  • be able to identify specific examples of how libraries are working with transfer populations in order to implement examples at their respective institutions.
  • learn and develop strategies for collaborating with other units on campus in order to assist transfer students.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Bridging the Gap: A Social Justice Approach to Campus Outreach
Sofia Leung (Teaching & Learning Program Manager) @ Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Callie Wiygul Branstiter (Undergraduate Engagement Librarian) @ University of Kansas

In our practice as academic librarians, outreach and engagement with campus stakeholders has largely focused on white, heteronormative groups. This presentation will explore the ways in which librarians can expand their outreach to include historically underrepresented groups, challenges and strategies for programming and instruction, and how this advances social justice in our libraries. We will reframe outreach as a reflective practice and a reciprocal relationship, in which we continuously “show up” to support and serve marginalized voices on campus instead of asking people who identify as people of color, LGBTQIA, people with disabilities, first-generation and or low-income college students to expend their emotional labor.

Participants will:

  • identify key stakeholders on campus in order to begin building mutually beneficial relationships while being aware of potential challenges.
  • develop the skills needed to create and implement a social justice outreach plan at their institutions.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Building for the Future: Information Literacy and Academic Freedom in China
Linda L. Daniel (Research & Instruction Librarian) @ Duke University

Information literacy and academic freedom are important issues in our world of global higher education. Ethical, legal and social issues surrounding the use of information, the development of information literacy skills, and access to academic freedom are key factors in determining how well students can develop cognitive skills, acquire international insights, and improve their global leadership capabilities. This is especially true in China as the government tightly controls access to information but also realizes the need to cultivate well-rounded global citizens rooted in their national culture. To achieve this goal, the government has invested in the development of top-tier joint-venture universities that promise to cultivate information literacy and critical thinking skills to help boost educational and career opportunities.

How this challenge is being met at one joint-university in China will be presented to show how the library can be a leader in international education as it partners with faculty, students and administrators to fully integrate information literacy into a liberal arts curriculum and into the culture of teaching and learning in China.

Participants will:

  • understand how to develop an information literacy outreach plan, in conjunction with strategic partners, to target an international audience
  • analyze the campus and higher education environment in order to design an information literacy program that aligns with and contributes to institutional mission and outcomes

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Charting the Library Firmament: Transforming Teaching to Create Meaningful Learning Experiences for Students
Roberto A. Arteaga (Library Fellow and Lecturer) @ Valparaiso University and Christine M. Moeller (Information Literacy and Instruction Librarian) @ St. Norbert College

The ACRL Board of Directors has stated that the Framework is now a part of the constellation of documents for information literacy. We argue that a narrow interpretation of this constellation metaphor fails to account for the differences among those in our profession and our different needs. Instead, we need to envision a more expansive star map -- one where all of our perspectives on scholarship, practice, and teaching are clearly represented, where we can identify and contextualize connections relative to our profession or institution, and where we can find guidance in times of need.

For many librarians, the Framework represents a deep, paradigmatic shift, both in regards to their practice and their identity as librarians. Just as the Framework aims to create lifelong learners, so too does it serve as a call for librarians to join in that journey of self-discovery and critical self-reflection. It also invites us to become self-directed learners, consider the different views of our profession, and shift to a learner-centered approach that supports student success.

This session will explore pedagogical connections across other disciplines, focusing on instructional methods such as instructional design, critical pedagogy, and transformative teaching, thus establishing these various pedagogical approaches as part of a larger star map. We will also share ideas about how and where to apply these approaches in order to diversify our teaching perspectives, continue to cultivate our teaching practice, and expand the reach of our work, with the goal of creating meaningful learning experiences for all students.

Participants will:

  • identify pedagogical connections across other disciplines;
  • recognize ways to incorporate diverse perspectives into teaching practices

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Correlating Use of Library Services with Student Success, and What We Learned Along the Way
Rachel Mulvihill (Head, Teaching & Engagement Department) and Penny Beile (Associate Director, Research, Education, & Engagement) @ University of Central Florida

In light of performance-based funding models for higher education and evidence-based assessment in libraries, many academic librarians are being called on to demonstrate how library use impacts student learning. At the University of Central Florida, there is a campus-wide emphasis on student success, and the library is involved in many high-level initiatives designed to increase student grades and retention rates. It is within this environment that a team of librarians began an ambitious assessment project to correlate student use of library services with academic success.

Beginning fall 2014, student data were collected as they interacted with one of five library service points, including face-to-face library instruction, online information literacy modules, and a courseware-based tutorial. Results indicate a positive correlation between use of one or more of the five library service points and end-of-semester course grades. Essentially, students who used the library enjoyed higher course grades than students who did not.

During this session, tribulations and successes also will be enumerated and discussed. Establishing workflows and communicating expectations between the library and other campus units involved in the study was a definite achievement, while gathering student data at the point of interaction with the library was sometimes challenging, and the sheer volume of data collected was daunting. The presenters will discuss how results were communicated to campus partners, outcomes of these discussions, and future plans for the research study, especially as pertains to identifying library instruction and information literacy as a high impact practice.

Participants will:

  • be able to understand variables and methods that may be used in student success assessment in order to design a local study
  • be able to use results of the current large-scale study in order to advocate for library services at their institution

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Creating a Data Posse
Rebecca Orozco (Faculty Engagement Librarian for the Sciences and Engineering), Tami Albin (Associate Librarian) and Karna Younger (Faculty Engagement Librarian) @ University of Kansas

The way data is captured, analyzed, communicated, and preserved within the academy is undergoing dynamic changes. In order to engage faculty and meet their data management needs, we are collaborating with the data services librarian to educate ourselves, fellow librarians, teaching faculty, and students. In this presentation, we share how we used this collaboration to develop digital learning objects for faculty to use in their courses, and to educate ourselves about data literacies. In the process, we ensured that conversations, engagement, and skill building surround data management is not seen as the sole task of one librarian, but a collective responsibility of many.

Participants will:

  • gain insight into the need for data literacies across disciplines.
  • acquire key vocabulary and language to launch conversations about data literacy with colleagues and teaching faculty across disciplines.
  • learn how to step outside of their comfort zone to collaborate with colleagues across library units to learn, develop, and strengthen their understanding of unfamiliar literacies, such as data literacies.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Creating Primary Sources with First-Generation Students
William Cuthbertson (Librarian for Undergraduate Engagement) @ California State University, Chico, Jay Trask (Head of Archival Services) and Jane Monson (Digital Initiatives Librarian) @ University of Northern Colorado

In response to a classroom need to teach the value and utility of primary sources, as well as combat the lack of contemporary student voices preserved in their archives, librarians at a medium-sized university developed a lesson in which first-generation students interview one another about their experiences during their first year of college. Interviews are recorded by the students and voluntarily added to the university’s permanent digital archives. This lesson demonstrates practical application of critical information literacy by elevating the experiences of underrepresented populations in the archival history of the university. It was authored by faculty from the university’s Instructional Services, Digital Initiatives, and Archival Services departments is embedded into the curriculum of the university’s credit-bearing courses in library and information research.

Participants will:

  • discuss methods for engaging students in their personal experiences as a means to build investment in classroom activities and university history.
  • discover the benefits of utilizing institutional repositories as a means to recognize students from underrepresented backgrounds.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Critical and Conflicted: A Reflection on Existing Tensions in Curriculum Mapping
Natalie Burclaff (Head of Information Literacy Initiatives) @ University of Baltimore, Veronica Arellano Douglas (Reference & Instruction Librarian) @ St. Mary's College of Maryland and Joanna Gadsby (Instruction Coordinator & Reference Librarian) @ University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Although curriculum mapping can be a proactive way to build an effective information literacy (IL) program, it’s not without its problems. This presentation will dismantle the notion of curriculum mapping as a one-size-fits-all solution. It will be analyzed as a way to share ownership of IL student learning outcomes; discussed in relation to institutional pressures to assess student learning; and critiqued through the lens of critical pedagogy. Participants will be asked to reflect on their institution’s needs, their own teaching philosophy, and what happens when these two value systems intersect through IL education and curriculum mapping.

Participants will:

  • reflect on external pressures in their own academic environment in order to determine their impact on curriculum mapping and assessment
  • articulate pedagogical values in order to identify meaningful approaches to curriculum mapping.
  • examine tensions between external pressures and pedagogical values in order to implement a balanced strategy for curriculum mapping.

Intended audience: At least some experience with the topic

Diversifying the Monoculture of Academic Authority: Teaching Inclusive Conceptions of Authority
Alexander Watkins (Art & Architecture Librarian) @ University of Colorado Boulder

Often when librarians teach authority and evaluation, we teach only academic authority and its specific markers. Knowledge from other cultural contexts, especially indigenous cultures, is rarely eligible for these markers and therefore too often excluded from consideration, credibility, and scholarly discourse, impoverishing the conversation and perpetuating inequity. The Framework tells us that authority is a culturally constructed artifact, but we cannot teach this without examining authority cross-culturally, considering other cultures’ ways of knowing. Reliance on Western authority when studying the culture, arts and artifacts of indigenous cultures effectively silences the voices of indigenous people who made the works under study, who used them in their rituals or daily life, and whose traditions they belong to. Under this system, interpretation of native cultures is denied to members of that culture, and reserved for those with Western authority. This should spur us as librarians to teach the validity of multiple authorities and educate against colonialist conceptions of authority that deny voice and agency to indigenous peoples. Teaching authority this way helps students understand that academic authority is not a neutral arbiter of quality, but just one of many culturally-specific knowledge systems. This presentation will explore how we can combine multi-cultural authorities, cultural ways of knowing, and library instruction.

Participants will:

  • understand the importance of teaching authority from multiple cultural perspectives
  • learn strategies to teach non-western authorities in both one-shot instruction sessions and credit courses

Intended audience: At least some experience with the topic

Don’t Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth: When the Data You Receive is Not the Data You Want
Savannah L Kelly (Research and Instruction Librarian) @ University of Mississippi

What do you do when the intervention you set out to measure did not make a difference, and the intervention you did not want to measure was more significant than you expected? This was the situation we found ourselves in when assessing the impact of a new video series on students’ research confidence. It was hypothesized that students who received video content in addition to a traditional face-to-face session would report higher research confidence levels than students who did not receive the video content. Not only were there negligible differences between the groups that watched the videos and those that did not, but students’ research confidence levels increased significantly – in all groups – after receiving the face-to-face instruction session. This finding was somewhat unwelcome, as we had hoped to move away from the one-shot method in favor of creating digital content.

This presentation will share one librarian’s critical reflection in the face of disconfirming assessment results. All assumptions were uprooted and analyzed – from the development of the confidence scale (was it measuring what it should have?), to the content of the videos (was it too advanced?), to the timing of the videos (administered after, and not before, the one-shot?), to the statistics used to analyze the data (paired t-test or independent t-test?), and finally to the results in hand: how does one maintain a rapidly unsustainable face-to-face instruction program?

Participants unfamiliar with assessing library instruction’s impact on students’ learning and affect will hear the inherent difficulties in trying to isolate and measure particular outcomes. More experienced librarians will have the opportunity to share their own challenges and solutions when confronted with unanticipated assessment results.

Participants will:

  • reflect on their own assessment results in order to determine when to accept an outcome and move forward, and when to regroup and revise the original assessment strategy

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Driving the Team: A Course Integrated Data Information Literacy and Science Communication Class
Megan Sapp Nelson (Associate Professor of Library Sciences) @ Purdue University

This presentation describes a 3 credit course that is a collaboration between an Earth Sciences Professor and a liaison librarian to teach junior College of Science majors to effectively communicate science topics to non-scientists. The topic of the class and the focal point for the communications are natural hazards and community resiliency. The students learn the physics and atmospheric sciences of hurricanes and tornadoes, as well as the geosciences of earthquakes. The students equally learn information literacy such as finding credible sources, reading a scholarly paper, finding and reusing data, citing scholarly work including data, sharing data with others by using file naming and README files and creating a data management plan.

The course features a significant collaboration with a campus visualization research group, which gives the students access to state of the art visualization software. The course also collaborates with the campus emergency manager and the National Weather Service office to give perspective on disaster response and resiliency, as well as to build in service learning projects. Building these collaborations added significant value to the course, in that students gain real world experience in data visualization and working with stakeholders while still completing specific learning objectives in both science communication and information literacy/data information literacy. This presentation explores the benefits and pitfalls of these collaborations, tips and tricks for building active learning around collaborations, and implications for other embedded Information Literacy courses.

Participants will:

  • identify techniques for discussing stated and unstated learning objectives with faculty members.
  • recognize the value of team teaching with disciplinary faculty in non-LIS courses.
  • examine new strategies for establishing collaborations with university personnel outside a course to enrich instruction.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Formative and Summative Assessment of Library Instruction (LI): Encouraging and Supporting "Reflective Teaching" Practices through Peer Observation
Bernadette M. López-Fitzsimmons (Associate Librarian for Instruction, Outreach & Research) @ Manhattan College

This presentation will discuss how “reflective teaching” peer recommendations in library instruction observations can be an effective way to encourage and support excellence in teaching and learning. These practices encourage instructor-librarians to monitor their teaching strategies and, then, re-tool lesson design appropriately.

There are two types of peer classroom assessments in education: formative and summative observations. Understanding the difference between the two is important in providing valid data to the instructor-librarian as well as reviewers of the applications for tenure and/or promotion.

Formative assessment provides feedback to instructor-librarians on how to re-tool teaching and learning styles, materials/activities, lesson design, and classroom management. When formative assessment is conducted, the observee can request that the observer pay attention to a particular aspect of the lesson. It can be a series of casual observations or an isolated informal visit. Summative assessment requires multiple reviewers to observe the same classes together,an extended period of time, a variety of lessons, and observing different academic disciplines and levels, and other institutional specifics. Avoiding bias may demand that a team be assigned to review particular lessons. If more than one lesson is to be observed, the same team should review subsequent lessons.

This presentation will speak to how ""reflective teaching practices"" can be applied to formative and summative peer recommendations to help instructor-librarians develop an awareness and mindfulness toward their teaching styles. As a result instructor-librarians will be able to organically orchestrate more fluid, active learning environments.

Participants will:

  • be able to provide reflective teaching practices as recommendations in formative and summative peer assessments of library instruction.
  • be able to recommend “reflective teaching” practices such as instructor’s diary, peer observations, video or audio recordings of lessons, anticipatory/exit slips, etc.
  • be able to coach librarians in developing a regular reflecting teaching routine to tweak a particular aspect of teaching, concentrate on managing classroom scenarios differently, or adapt to issues with specific populations more efficiently.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Galloping Into the Unknown: Utilizing Design Thinking to Reimagine Instruction, Collaboration, and Innovation
Patrick Tomlin (Associate Director, Learning Environments), Stefanie Metko (Associate Director, Teaching and Learning Engagement) and Lisa Becksford (Educational Technologies Librarian) @ Virginia Tech

The creative process of design thinking has proven an extraordinarily powerful and agile tool for fostering innovation and problem-solving in a diverse number of fields, yet its application to harnessing change in libraries and, in particular, developing new mindsets for faculty engaged in library instruction has remained largely unexamined. This session discusses a series of case studies that showcase how one research institution has applied the tenets of design thinking to build better instructional teams and spaces, devise solutions for current and emerging instructional programs, and embrace changes that comes with new institutional directions for information literacy. Utilizing interactive exercises, the presenters will demonstrate how instruction librarians can create a culture of innovation by embracing constraints and ambiguity, creating team-building milestones for success in program development, and harnessing a kaleidoscope of user perspectives in order to thrive amidst changes in institutional strategic priorities.

Participants will:

  • define design thinking and how it encourages a culture that embraces collaboration, innovation and new mindsets within libraries.
  • reflect on how case study examples could be adapted and applied within their institution context for designing innovative instructional teams and spaces, new and emerging library instruction programs, and adaptation of existing programs to meet new demands.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Growing Insight: Course Instructor Perspectives on Assignment Design
Ryne Leuzinger (Research and Instruction Librarian) and Jacqui Grallo (Research and Instructional Technology Librarian) @ Cal State Monterey Bay

"One-shot information literacy instruction sessions typically entail librarians engaging in teaching that is course-integrated and tailored to a specific research assignment. Yet, librarians often have limited insight into factors and assumptions that influence assignment design. Using qualitative data viewed through the lens of evidence-based, high-impact practices in assignment design, this session intends to shed light on course instructors' perspectives on creating assignments. Attendees will gain insight into commonalities in course instructors' assignment design practices and will consider specific strategies for utilizing this information to support effective assignment design and student learning.

Participants will:

  • gain insight into commonalities in course instructors’ assignment design practices, and reflect on them in relation to evidence-based, high impact assignment design strategies.
  • critically reflect upon their approach to creating information literacy-oriented lesson plans and activities that are connected to course assignments and how these can be made most impactful for students in light of the data presented.
  • gain knowledge of methods used by librarians to collaborate with or provide support for course instructors engaged in assignment design.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Hold Your Horses: Staying Steady (and Staying Neutral?) in Turbulent Times
Marcia Rapchak (Director of Research and Information Skills and Instruction Librarian) and Erin Anthony (Online Learning Librarian) @ Duquesne University

This session will explore the issue of whether or not librarians should be neutral in our approach to teaching information literacy. Many students wish to take on research topics that are controversial, and we may find ourselves torn about how to work with these students in a way that respects the autonomy of the student while also combating stereotypes, injustice, and misinformation. In addition, some of us may use the Framework to teach information literacy in a way that sheds light on issues of social justice, racism, sexism, ableism, homophobia, and more. However, we may find that students push back by claiming that we are imposing our political beliefs onto them. Should we attempt to be neutral during such times? If so, how do we do so in a way that does not condone injustice? If we aren’t neutral, how do we approach teaching in a way that does not alienate students? This session will explore the implications and methods of taking a neutral approach or not. We will look at the professional and civic responsibilities of librarians and educators in higher education and consider how these can inform our approach to teaching. We will also look at how the Framework, particular Authority is Constructed and Contextual, and critical information literacy might allow us to approach IL instruction in a way that involves and respects the student while not betraying our dedication to justice. Participants will role play as students and librarians discussing research topics so that they can explore their comfort level with addressing controversial issues. Additionally, participants will be invited to discuss their perspective of the concepts raised in the session.

Participants will:

  • compare a neutral approach to teaching information literacy to an approach that emphasizes social justice
  • describe how civic and professional responsibilities impact information literacy instruction
  • use the Framework to guide students how to research controversial issues

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

It Takes a Community to Cultivate the Assessment Crop
Kelly LaVoice (Coordinator of the Business & Hospitality Research Team) and Kelee Pacion (Instruction Coordinator and Undergraduate Life Sciences Librarian) @ Cornell University

Is negative feedback always negative, or can be it be a positive catalyst to promote change? When a University survey to undergraduate students produced a lukewarm response about the helpfulness of library instruction sessions, instructors seized the opportunity to gain administrative support to design their own assessment tool to get at the heart of the dissatisfaction.

Initially beginning as a pilot program, a team of three instruction librarians and an assessment specialist designed a seven question survey that would be used in courses where library instruction sessions were designed to support a research assignment. Positive feedback on the value of this data led the survey to be accepted into regular workflows, and participation became mandated by library administration. At the time of this presentation, the presenters will have three semesters of undergraduate assessment data to share, with feedback from almost 1,000 undergraduates.

The presenters will discuss how they have used feedback from their own courses to engage in deeper discussions with faculty members. They will also explain how positive responses from library administration and instruction librarians have led to changes to the instruction committee’s charge, collaborations, and programming. This session will also address the challenges of programmatic assessment, including gaining administrative buy-in, designing the survey instrument, and analyzing large sets of data.

Participants will:

  • be able to articulate the benefits of a uniform information literacy assessment tool to measure and evaluate student learning and perceptions over time
  • recognize the importance of quantitative and qualitative formative assessment measures to the teaching and learning cycle

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Leading by Letting Go: Shifting Strategies for First Year Library Instruction and the Creation of an “Instructor’s Toolkit”
Laura Birkenhauer (Academic Resident Librarian), Lindsay Miller (First Year Experience Librarian), Erin Vonnahme (Humanities Librarian) and Gemmicka Piper (Academic Resident Librarian) @ Miami University

After a long history of jumping through hoops to meet first year instruction needs, librarians took the lead to develop a new approach to library instruction for first year composition courses. This new strategy, coupled with the creation of an online “Instructor’s Toolkit,” lightened the workload for librarians while simultaneously allowing for increasingly engaging instruction and greater faculty involvement.

Breakout session presenters will detail the process involved in leading faculty to embrace a laissez-faire library instruction strategy and describe the benefits reaped from this new approach. The presentation will include a live demonstration of the online “Instructor’s Toolkit.” Session attendees will be actively engaged through structured small group discussion, brainstorming and opportunities to ask questions of presenters. Participants will walk away empowered with the tools to initiate similar shifts in their own institutions.

Participants will:

  • identify strategies for and discuss benefits of initiating changes to stereotypical first year composition library instruction
  • develop an action plan for leading similar changes in their own institutions

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Leading Horses to Water: Constructing Courses to Get Students to Drink
Dan Chibnall (STEM Librarian), Carrie Dunham-LaGree (Librarian for Digital Literacy & General Education) and Sam Becker (Campus Engagement Librarian) @ Drake University

Credit-bearing courses provide the kind of environment best suited to dig deeper into information literacy and the concepts contained in the ACRL Framework. In this presentation, three librarians will outline their experiences crafting courses and pedagogical techniques that integrate information literacy skills using non-traditional materials. Though the use of fiction and films based on real women, science fiction, and popular nonfiction, the presenters will share how they built individualized courses that meet an information literacy curriculum requirement.

One of the challenges of credit-bearing information literacy courses can be the inability to provide authentic context for students. Information literacy can be a hard sell no matter how well its importance is articulated. Students who do well in courses may not understand how skills transfer outside of the artificial contexts provided. In this presentation, we will address the ways that course content can be used to provide authentic context by asking students to use non-traditional materials to consider research. We will demonstrate the way that individualized course content has impacted our design decisions, assessment, and instructional activities while still adhering to a common set of objectives.

Participants will:

  • compare methods for interpreting a standardized set of learning outcomes and the ACRL framework through the lens of unique course content.
  • recognize opportunities for incorporating non-traditional materials into their information literacy programs and courses.
  • identify opportunities for using popular materials to expand and enhance information literacy programs and courses.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Letting Students Do the Vetting: An Experiment in Teaching Students to Write infoPlaylists for the Library Blog
Jason Ezell (Instruction & Research Coordinator) @ Loyola University, New Orleans and Joyce Garczynski (Assistant University Librarian for Development & Communication) @ Towson University

It’s challenging to demonstrate to students the everyday importance of quality source selection. But, in the age of "fake news," it's vital that librarians tackle the challenge. In this presentation, we outline how teaching students to write “infoPlaylists” (vetted webliographies on current topics) for the library blog importantly reframes website evaluation as a socially valuable skill students can perform. We describe the infoPlaylist as a simple but innovative form which gives students’ evaluative skills an audience, offers instructors an alternative research assignment, positions the library blog as a venue between university and the wider public, and lends authenticity to library instruction. We further detail the assignment, its assessment, and the infoPlaylist’s reception.

Participants will:

  • recognize key features of the infoPlaylist as a form of research writing and as a course assignment
  • formulate ways to integrate the assignment into library instruction programs
  • explore its potential for broader library communications initiatives

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Librarians and Immersive Learning: Opportunities for Collaborations Using Virtual Reality
Kristal Sergent Boulden (Social Sciences & Humanities Librarian) @ University of Oklahoma

Virtual reality (VR) platforms provide exciting opportunities for students to interact with educational content in new ways. At the University of Oklahoma Libraries, students and faculty leverage VR and 3D technology to facilitate learning and disseminate knowledge. These innovative technologies also create opportunities for productive collaborations between librarians, technology specialists, and faculty.

This session presents a case study of using VR technology for an assignment in an undergraduate anthropology course. The presenter will detail the planning process for integrating VR into the class and the collaborative process between the professor, technologists, and the anthropology subject librarian. This presentation outlines specific strategies for working with faculty and technologists and discusses how to anticipate and resolve challenges collaboratively. The presentation also addresses how librarians can identify opportunities for collaboration within the library and across campus. Finally, the implications of these collaborations for library projects, campus outreach, and student learning will be discussed.

Participants will:

  • identify opportunities for collaboration with technologists in order to support information and digital literacy for specific courses
  • develop strategies for working collaboratively with campus and library partners to ensure a positive educational experience for students

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Library + Living Learning Community: A Partnership Story
Lisa Jarrell (Head of Educational Technology and Resources) @ Ball State University

This presentation will describe the partnership between the liaison librarian for elementary and secondary education and the faculty working with the Education Living Learning Community, located in a residence hall. Attendees will learn about the hows and whys of this partnership, including details about temporarily housing part of the library collection in the hall for use in the community's maker studio. We'll also talk about assessment of the program and the ways that involvement in the living learning community is demonstrating the value of the library's collections and services to both students and faculty. The session will provide practical advice for temporary use of library collections in non-library spaces, assessment of student use of the collections, and strategies for forging a collaborative relationship with faculty and residence hall personnel.

Participants will:

  • identify concerns and practical strategies for temporarily housing library collections in non-library spaces.
  • identify strategies for partnering with housing and residence life personnel to encourage student engagement with library resources.

Intended audience: At least some experience with the topic

The Library Steeplechase: A New Breed of Library Tour at VCU
Rachel A. McCaskill (Learning Technologies Librarian) and Jennifer Stout (Teaching and Learning Librarian) @ Virginia Commonwealth University

Looking for an alternative to time-consuming, uninspiring in-person tours for our first-year students, VCU Librarians used Green Door Labs’ Edventure Builder to create an interactive mobile tour that students take on their smartphones or tablets. Incorporating all five floors of the library and highlighting the most salient services and resources for first year students, this self-guided tour energized students and saved us time. Learn about the process we went through to create and improve this mobile tour and leave with inspiration to shake up library tours at your own institution!

Participants will:

  • learn how to choose the most essential pieces of information about their institutions in order to create a quick and relevant mobile tour.
  • brainstorm interactively about how to customize a mobile tour for the unique needs of their patrons.
  • learn how to gather feedback from patrons in order to enhance their mobile tour experience.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Longitudinal Study of Student Success in a One-Credit Library Course
Christina Heady (Coordinator of First-Year Instruction) and Joshua Vossler (Head of Reference & Instruction) @ Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Two librarians and an applied psychology doctoral student (not in attendance) analyzed more than two decades of data from a one-credit library course offered at a Midwestern research university. In order to paint a picture of how our course affects student success, we created a model of the typical student who takes the course, which we compared with similar students who did not.

This presentation will focus on the study’s findings and how it will influence our library’s decisions about the future of the course. We will briefly describe the background and purpose of our study, including a crucial stumbling point that ultimately led us in the right direction, and situate our results within the existing literature. We will close with a discussion of challenges we encountered along the way, and suggestions to other librarians who might consider embarking on similar projects.

Participants will:

  • be able to explain the process of conducting a longitudinal study in order advocate for assessing the impact of credit bearing courses on student success.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic At least some experience with the topic

Meeting Students Where They Are: Using Assessment Data to Inform One-Shot Curriculum
Brianne Markowski (Information Literacy Librarian & Assistant Professor) and Stephanie Evers (Information Literacy Librarian & Lecturer) @ University of Northern Colorado

How do students use the sources we help them find during library instruction sessions? To answer this question we scored research papers written by students enrolled in a first-year experience course to assess how well they were finding, incorporating, and citing appropriate sources. During this presentation we’ll share our assessment process, from developing and norming the rubric to using the data to inform changes to our one-shot lesson plan. We will also share preliminary assessment results following implementation of the new curriculum. Our results may inspire you to rethink the focus of your first-year instruction.

Participants will:

  • describe a process for using student papers to inform changes to one-shot curriculum
  • reflect on how a rubric assessment process could be adopted in your library

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Open this Box: Leveraging the Popularity of Escape Rooms to Create an Engaging Library Instruction Session
Amber Wilson (Head of Education and Outreach) and Jessica Riedmueller (Instructional Services Librarian) @ University of Central Arkansas

Looking for interactive ways to engage with your students? Have a knack for puzzles and problem solving? This presentation will explore the process of creating a library instruction session modeled after the popular escape room concept. This discussion will include the design and planning process, implementation strategies, lessons learned, and pulling it off with no budget and limited resources. We will also reflect on identifying partnership opportunities across campus and cultivating those relationships for future collaborations. Finally, we will examine strategies to critically assess the students’ capacity for the application of the information literacy skills learned.

Participants will:

  • learn strategies to design and implement an interactive library instruction session incorporating escape room concepts
  • anticipate challenges that may arise during the creation process and identify possible strategies to overcome them
  • develop the skills and knowledge necessary to critically assess the effectiveness of escape room-style sessions and evaluate student achievement of specific information literacy skills

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Optimizing the Field Through a Curriculum Mapping Initiative: Adapting the Framework for Assessing Information Literacy Programs
Stefanie Metko (Associate Director, Teaching & Learning Engagement), Julia Feerrar (Learning Strategy Librarian) and Amanda MacDonald (Teaching & Learning Engagement Librarian) @ Virginia Tech

This presentation will share a new model of curriculum mapping to demonstrate how library instruction programs can make connections between high profile campus initiatives and library instruction. While this model was designed to address one institution’s changes to the general education curriculum, the model is flexible and transferable. Attendees will be able to define various types of curriculum mapping approaches and identify strategies for designing their own curriculum mapping frameworks. Frameworks can be used to map library instruction to the student experience, space usage, and new university-wide initiatives in an effort to assess future changes in information literacy programs.

Participants will:

  • define various types of curriculum mapping approaches in order to select the appropriate framework for their institutional needs
  • identify strategies needed for designing a curriculum mapping framework, such as defining scope and purpose, locating appropriate partners, and designing templates
  • reflect on ways that curriculum mapping can provide solutions to complex issues facing library instruction programs

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Our Difference is our Strength: Collaboration and Creativity in Co-Creating System Wide Information Literacy Learning Outcomes
Colleen Burgess (Associate Librarian) @ Huron University College and Tom Adam (Copyright Librarian), Kim McPhee (Teaching and Learning Librarian) and Christy Sich (Research and Instructional Services Librarian) @ Western University

As instruction librarians, we find ourselves siloed from our fellow teaching librarians and faculty in the design, delivery, and assessment of our instruction. We persevere in adopting a creative lens when asked to teach specific skills within limited time frames, we negotiate for more time with our students to engage in higher order thinking about research and Information Literacy (IL), and we attempt to convince faculty to allow us a sliver of a grade percentage to reinforce the value of the assignments we employ in-session. At Western Libraries we are attempting to switch this reactive stance we’ve often found ourselves in as instruction librarians supporting pre-developed courses by co-creating a set of system-wide learning outcomes (LOs) informed and inspired by the ACRL’s respective Framework and Standards documents, Ontario’s Undergraduate Degree Level Expectations, as well as our institution’s own undergraduate wide LOs. Drawing upon our differences and collective creativity, Western Librarians and those of the affiliated colleges have engaged in a collaborative consultative process in writing these LOs and wish to share our best practices that can be applied in a similar process at your home institution. In this session, members of the project team will discuss the process of developing a shared understanding of IL across a diverse system of instructing librarians, the challenges of collaboration with a large and diverse group of colleagues in the development of core LOs relevant across STEM, Health Sciences, A&H, SS, and Fine Arts programs of study, and the value of the document as a tool to leverage for more meaningful librarian/faculty teaching collaborations.

Participants will:

  • be able to understand and discuss the importance of embracing a complex process in order to invite diverse and dissenting voices to collaborate on the development of institutional IL learning outcomes.
  • in light of the best practices shared, reflect on and articulate the opportunities and challenges of pursuing a similar process at their home institution.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Pedagogical v. Pathfinder: Reimagining Course and Research Guides for Student Success
M. Sara Lowe (Educational Development Librarian) and Bronwen K. Maxson (Humanities Librarian) @ IUPUI and Sean Stone (Dentistry Librarian) @ IU School of Dentistry

What is the best way to design course and research guides? Can the design of a guide impact student learning and transform student information-seeking processes? This presentation will detail results of two studies (one in-classroom, the other usability) which use qualitative and quantitative assessments to determine if guide design aids in student learning. Draw on our successes and failures to invigorate your course and research guides for transformative learning.

Participants will:

  • be able to recognize how the design and organization of guides affects student learning in order to design their own guides.
  • be able to interpret student information-seeking behavior through observed and recorded data in order to develop guides that aid student success.
  • be able to examine the critical pedagogical implications of student learning within the confines of guides in order to build their own capacity in this area.

Intended audience: At least some experience with the topic

Preparing Your Crop: Understanding Student Experiences with New Technology and the Impact on Instruction
Christi Piper (Instruction Librarian) and Joel Tonyan (Systems and User Experience Librarian) @ University of Colorado Colorado Springs

Has your library recently implemented a discovery service? Are you unsure how to integrate its use into your library’s information literacy classes? This session will describe a usability study the Kraemer Family Library conducted after implementing ProQuest Summon to understand how intuitive the service is to students, what instruction they will need in its use, and how well the library’s existing instruction models prepare students to use a discovery service. Participants will also learn about practical activities and instructional ideas for moving away from teaching search interfaces to teaching critical thinking skills based on concepts in the 2015 ACRL Framework.

Participants will:

  • be able to identify the differences in student needs and information literacy knowledge and how those impact entry level information literacy instruction
  • discover new teaching activities and techniques that focus on critical thinking and concepts in the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Putting the Cart Before the Horse: Creating Online Information Literacy Modules for a Reluctant Faculty
Cecelia Parks (Research and Instruction Librarian) @ University of Mississippi

Many libraries face the challenge of meeting increasing demand for information literacy instruction with decreasing library resources. This presentation explores one library’s answer to that challenge: using online modules to replace in-person instruction for a required undergraduate writing course, addressing the development of the modules and assessment of faculty perceptions of the modules. Though the modules went through several cycles of feedback and revision, a recent faculty survey showed persistent instructor reluctance to embrace online information literacy instruction in the place of in-person library instruction. This presentation examines ways to balance faculty feedback and desires with the realities of library resource constraints and concludes with a discussion of lessons learned and next steps.

Participants will:

  • be able to assess faculty responses to changes in library instruction offerings.
  • be able to evaluate plans to create online information literacy instruction tools.
  • be able to identify possible solutions to implement (or avoid) in facing challenges of increased demand for library instructional services.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Questioning Authority: An Exploration of Diverse Sources
Jo Angela Oehrli (Learning Librarian), Alexandra Stark (Digital Education Librarian) and Amanda Peters (Learning Communities Librarian) @ University of Michigan

A team of librarians created a new classroom activity based on the Frame Authority is Constructed and Contextual in order to instruct their students to think critically about source evaluation. The group explored implications of a more nuanced approach to evaluation that questions the concept of authority before deciding on a course of action.

The team will share a lesson plan as well as options for various levels of implementation including a survey platform, slides, formal & informal class discussion prompts, and an Articulate Storyline gameful application of the content. Preliminary assessment results will be included.

Participants will:

  • be able to create an adaptable lesson plan based on the Frame Authority is Constructed and Contextual in order to instruct their students to think critically about source evaluation.
  • be able to apply a model which is based on an exploration of the Framework in order to translate the Framework into their own current instructional practices.

Intended audience: At least some experience with the topic

Racing Together Toward the Finish Line: Partnerships for Supporting a Library Open House
Megan Gilpin (Coordinator of Outreach)and Alissa Zawoyski (Collection Management Specialist) @ Penn State University

Over the course of 15 years, the Open House at Penn State Libraries has grown from a simple walking tour into an important educational event with strategic learning outcomes designed to reach over 7,000 students. Session participants will learn about the evolution of this event with a focus on the key internal and external partnerships required for successful program implementation, situating the event within the libraries’ teaching and learning program curriculum, and performing meaningful assessment. Participants will also engage in a discussion about how to scale the development of such an event at their own institutions.

Participants will:

  • be able to explain key principals of planning an open house, including the development of learning outcomes, identifying stakeholders inside and outside the library, and event assessment
  • be able to explain key factors for successful implementation of a library open house
  • be able to apply the ideas and principles from the presenters’ open house to their own institution in order to develop and scale an open house event

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Reading Is Research: Promoting Critical Reading Through Embedded Librarianship
Marc Bess (Instruction Librarian) @ University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Critical reading encourages students to go beyond the surface level by deeply reading, processing, and analyzing information during the research process. As such, it has been increasingly emphasized in higher education.

Library instruction centered on critical reading skills not only prepares students to be more effective researchers as college students, but helps build valuable information evaluation competencies that can be transferred to the professional world.

This session focuses on Reading Is Research, a collaborative instruction initiative between librarians and faculty that aims to cultivate critical reading skills through embedded librarianship. In this program, a librarian works with a faculty member to design assignments, plan library instruction sessions, and create customized digital learning objects to build critical reading skills. Reading Is Research encourages students to process and connect information from a wide variety of sources to explore high level concepts such as conflict, narrative, and perspective. By illustrating how to look beyond the most superficial aspects of information to discover how sources truly connect with one another, students are better prepared to become more efficient information analysts and creators. This session will focus on strategies for promoting critical reading through instruction, designing assignments that cultivate these vital skills, and building partnerships that position library instruction as an integral part of the curriculum.

Participants will:

  • learn how critical reading skills can be successfully cultivated through library instruction
  • learn new strategies for collaborating with faculty on library instruction initiatives
  • discover how to design assignments to build critical reading skills

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Redesigning a FYE library module: Cleveland Based Learning
Ben Richards (Business & Communication Librarian) @ Cleveland State University

After several years of consistently offering the same one-shot session and library assignment in the First Year Experience seminar, feedback from several stakeholders in the course indicated there was a need for something fresh. Working with First Year Experience staff and a planning committee, two librarians worked together to propose a new lesson plan that would retain information literacy learning objectives while also incorporating elements of civic engagement, exploration of the areas surrounding campus, and local history, situating research in the context of problem solving. Throughout the FYE course, students receive scaffolded instruction regarding the assignment. The final product is a group presentation regarding their research question and a self-reflection writing assignment. The lesson includes information literacy outcomes informed by the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education. . At risk was losing a relatively straightforward and well-established lesson and replacing it with something more open-ended. There were both successes and lessons to be learned from planning and implementing the new lesson plan.

The session will inform attendees about what led to the course redesign, the planning and implementation process, and observations and outcomes from the 1st year of using the new lesson. Advice and considerations for librarians and staff considering a similar undertaking will be provided, as well as associated lesson plans and course support materials that can be reused or modified.

Participants will:

  • assess the utility of a similar FYE library module at their institution
  • reflect on the process of redesigning a FYE library module

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Reining in Information Literacy Instruction: Using Faculty Survey Data to Guide the Process
Veronica Bielat (Librarian III/Instruction Coordinator) and Judith M. Arnold (Librarian IV/Liaison Coordinator) @ Wayne State University and LuMarie Guth (Business Librarian), Maria Perez-Stable (Research & Instruction Librarian) and Patricia Fravel Vander Meer (Research & Instruction Librarian) @ Western Michigan University

Administering a successful and sustainable information literacy program depends upon dialog between librarians and disciplinary faculty as key stakeholders. Two academic institutions surveyed their faculties on the importance of information literacy for student success, the applicability of the ACRL Framework, and attitudes toward collaborating with librarians. This session will present quantitative and qualitative data and discuss how the institutions will use it to align instruction with the expressed values of faculty to help strategically guide integration of the Framework into programs and leverage strengths in an environment of constricting budgets and staffing.

The presentation will examine survey responses, reviewing similarities and differences from both institutional and disciplinary perspectives, including to what degree faculty value information literacy. Using survey data as well as themes from the qualitative data related to motivations and barriers to collaboration, we will engage the audience in predicting faculty responses to the ACRL Frames and in discussing ways librarians can respond to collaboration barriers. Presenters will offer examples of how the data will guide their program planning and changes, capitalizing on strengths, and continuing to offer what faculty value in a challenging budgetary landscape. With shrinking budgets and staff, information literacy programs must prioritize efforts. The survey data offers a tool to rein in ever-increasing demands on information literacy programs by using faculty perspectives to help guide the process of incorporating the Framework and identifying what disciplines and courses can be best served by an information literacy program.

Participants will:

  • use the two most highly ranked ACRL Frames selected by faculty in the survey in order to guide prioritizing learning goals when planning instruction sessions
  • critically examine suggested faculty language for describing the Frames in order to plan how to initiate a conversation about the Frames with their faculty
  • examine faculty preferences for collaboration with a librarian in order to identify potentially successful approaches

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Research as a Resume Builder: Delivering a Career-focused Information Literacy Certificate Program
Megan Blauvelt Heuer (Head of Information Literacy) @ Southern Methodist University

While there are many information literacy badging programs out there, most focus on general library and academic research. The Temerlin Information Literacy Certificate Program at Southern Methodist University was created in response to employers’ complaints about the lack of research skills for new hires in the field of advertising. This session will cover the benefits and challenges of creating a certificate program that focuses on a specific discipline and that seeks to teach career competencies as well as ideas for making a similar program successful. Topics include identifying learning goals, developing legitimacy with students, faculty, and employers, and matching program goals to appropriate assessment. Attendees will have a chance to discuss how similar ideas could be enacted at their institutions and will come away with ideas and supporting materials for helping students address real world information problems.

Participants will:

  • identify career-focused information literacy goals for a certificate program
  • recognize methods for gaining legitimacy and buy-in from students, faculty, and employers
  • match certificate program goals with appropriate assessment methods

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Running Mates: An Integrated Information Literacy and STEM Curriculum
Bethany Havas (Reference & Instruction Librarian) and Adrienne Button Harmer (Instruction Coordinator and Assistant Department Head) @ Georgia Gwinnett College

Library and STEM faculty at Georgia Gwinnett College have worked together for eight years to embed information literacy into the required introductory STEM classes for all our STEM majors. We will demonstrate how we use the ADDIE model to inform our practice: collaborative instructional design, interventions and workshops, pre-tests, tutorials, in-class activities, and methods of student assessment and reflection. We highlight our assessment findings and their impact on our continuing efforts and future collaboration, particularly as our chemistry program includes the library faculty in developing an exciting new STEM project for the 2017-2018 academic year.

Participants will:

  • determine how the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy can be adopted and adapted to integrate information literacy into the STEM curriculum
  • describe and apply the ADDIE design model to their own collaborative instructional design efforts

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Sowing Accessibility in Learning Objects So Users Can Reap the Educational Rewards
Katie Stewart (Distance Education Librarian and Erica Getts (Distance Education Librarian) @ Johns Hopkins University

The implementation of learning objects has increasingly become a top priority for instruction librarians. In the effort to design these materials, concepts such as active learning and student engagement are usually at the forefront of the creation process. While interactive media such as tutorials, infographics, and concept maps have been known to achieve higher levels of engagement, the accessibility of these objects is often overlooked. Users with vision loss, hearing impairment, and other disabilities may not be able to experience the materials in the same way as others, potentially preventing them from learning altogether. In this session, attendees will (re)visit the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 with respect to the creation of various learning objects. The presenters will discuss their efforts to critically evaluate their own preexisting materials and best practices for the creation of new materials in order to provide an equally positive learning experience to all users.

Participants will:

  • identify best practices for accessibility that can be incorporated into the development of future learning objects
  • recognize specific changes that can be made to improve the accessibility of existing learning objects

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

A Strong Start Out of the Gate! Building Student Engagement Before Class Begins
Lindy Scripps-Hoekstra (Liberal Arts Liaison Librarian) @ Grand Valley State University

It’s ten minutes before the start of your instruction session, the students are trickling in and you are… fiddling with the computer? Shuffling papers? Making small talk with the professor? Rather than leaving students with nothing to do but thumb through their phones, take advantage of this time to build student engagement. Long known to K-12 educators as “bellwork,” learn how to enhance your instruction by developing activities that spark student interest before the start of a session. This presentation will detail and demonstrate strategies designed to activate prior knowledge, facilitate self-assessment, and build rapport. Attendees will build collections of sample activities to help them make the most out of every minute with students.

Participants will:

  • be able to identify the pedagogical purpose of engaging students and setting the tone in the minutes leading up the start of an instructional session
  • be able to incorporate short activities to prior to instructional sessions by creating a collection of samples and participating in three select examples

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Teach the Teachers, Reach the Students: Badging for Digital Citizenship
Trudi E. Jacobson (Head, Information Literacy Department), Kelsey O'Brien (Information Literacy Librarian) @ University at Albany, SUNY and Michele Forte (Assistant Professor) @ SUNY Empire State College

Librarians and faculty members from three institutions collaborated to adapt a metaliteracy Digital Citizen badge for use with graduate literacy education students. The multi-faceted goal is not only for these students to affirm their roles as digital citizens, but also to actively teach and model such citizenship to their prospective students. This grant-funded project, which adapts content from an existing metaliteracy badging system, incorporates mechanisms to encourage a community of users, and serves as a model for collaborations with faculty across various disciplines.

In this session, project collaborators will briefly introduce metaliteracy (metaliteracy.org), provide an overview of the badging system (metaliteracybadges.org), and discuss the components added for this project, including rubrics for assessment, and mechanisms that worked well for collaborating. We are not only concerned with collaboration within the grant team; we also built components that will encourage educators to create open access learning objects for an Educators Corner and an Educators Conference.

Drawing from expertise as co-creators and researchers in initiatives such as the new ACRL Information Literacy Framework and the Connecting Credentials (connectingcredentials.org) and Global Learning Qualifications Frameworks (funded by the Lumina Foundation), we have worked together to create a robust resource that will be available to every SUNY institution, and, ultimately, to interested institutions beyond SUNY. We encourage participants to actively engage in the presentation by contributing ideas for badging opportunities based on your own professional development and curricular goals to an open forum in the Educators Corner.

Participants will:

  • recognize the potential for digital badging in teaching students
  • Identify the key components that characterize this successful collaboration
  • assess the potential application of these collaborative elements to their institution

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

Teaching Power and Authority in Library Discovery Systems
Andrew Battista (Librarian for Geospatial Information Systems) @ New York University

This session explores the connection between critical library pedagogy and the technologies we use to help students discover information. When introducing students to library discovery tools and resources, it is important to develop conversations on information literacy and social justice within the context of discovery, or “the set of affordances through which users search, explore, find, and interact with the information resources they need, particularly collections held by a library” (Chris Bourg and Bess Sadler). Many of the platforms and concepts students encounter must be interpreted alongside the signals within discovery systems that convey power and authority. Interface design, split screen layouts, alternative visualizations, and relevancy ranking algorithms are all features that convey such markers of authority and context. In this presentation, I explore how a recent project to survey the landscape of discovery tools at New York University has engaged with the ACRL Framework to frame our priorities in development and presentation in the context of these questions of power and authority in higher education. I illustrate a few tangible approaches to manipulating NYU's deployments of Blacklight, LibGuides, and other discovery environments with attention to the Framework's imperative to understand the sources and context of knowledge.

Participants will:

  • investigate the tools and technologies important to library discovery today in order to facilitate critical approaches to providing and teaching information discovery
  • explore implementations of the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in both application development and teaching contexts in order to demonstrate critical approaches to information discovery
  • develop hands on approaches to exploring the ideological underpinnings of proprietary and open source discovery platforms in order to engage students in critical evaluation

Intended audience: At least some experience with the topic

Telling Stories through Design: Harnessing Community Narratives for an Information Literacy Tutorial
Chloe Barnett (Instruction & Reference Librarian) @ Westminster College

We all belong to communities that share common narratives, stories that we recognize as our own. At Westminster College, we believe that stories can be effective teaching tools, fostering engaged learning by allowing students to connect instruction to their own lives. This presentation will describe how librarians at Westminster redesigned an online information literacy tutorial with the college community in mind, using a semi-narrative structure intended to inspire students who spend weekends skiing in the Wasatch Mountains, studying brine flies at the Great Salt Lake, or fighting for social justice.

The presentation will draw on research from the fields of library and information science, teaching and learning, and instructional design to show how community stories can play a central role in information literacy instruction. Participants will explore how stories can be conveyed through text and image in online learning environments and will consider concepts such as visual narrative and branding/visual identity. We will also discuss the methods Westminster librarians used to collect their campus stories and how students were involved in the design, assessment, and revision of the tutorial.

Participants will:

  • describe how stories can be powerful tools in information literacy instruction, fostering engaged learning in our students by providing opportunities for them to make connections to their own lives
  • develop tutorials that evoke community narratives using images, text, and other design elements
  • implement strategies for working with students on the design of online information literacy instruction

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

“This Horse Race is Rigged!” Teaching Popular Source Evaluation in an Era of Fake News, Post-Truth, and Confirmation Bias
Lane Wilkinson (Director of Library Instruction) @ University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

The role of fake and misleading news in influencing public opinion is a hot topic and librarians are right at the front lines, teaching students how to distinguish information from misinformation. Yet, information literacy concepts such as credibility, authority, and reliability are often strained under the weight of partisan skepticism of traditionally credible sources. Paradoxically, some of our students who are most committed to rejecting traditional markers of trustworthiness are also among our most information literate students. This presentation will look at the psychology of how we decide to trust information sources and will present a novel approach to addressing fake news, confirmation bias, and the student who says, “the mainstream media is rigged!”

Participants will:

  • be able to understand how learners naturally establish the trustworthiness of information sources in order to better construct information literacy lessons plans.
  • be able to understand how concepts of credibility, authority, and reliability are analyzed in other disciplines in order to add interdisciplinary approaches to information literacy curriculum design.

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic.

What’s a Jockey Without a Horse? Librarians and Faculty Building Community Together Around the Framework
Rachel Stott (Teaching and Learning Librarian) @ University of Colorado Denver - Auraria Library

What will the disciplinary faculty teaching information literacy courses think of all this? That’s the question Old Dominion University librarians often circled back to as we grappled with how the ACRL Framework fit into ODU's information literacy general education learning outcomes. To help arrive at a shared understanding of how the Framework plays into individual and programmatic pedagogy, we organized a series of “casual conversations” around the Framework. Through a mix of individual reflection, small group work, and large group discussion, both faculty and librarians laid out the ways we currently address the Frames in our instruction and ways we may improve or make changes to our approach. This presentation will solicit participant examples of work done with faculty around the Framework; outline the planning and marketing process for organizing the workshop series; provide the questions and activities used in each workshop; share the ideas, themes, and collaborations that resulted from the workshop series; provide time for participants to think about and share steps they may take to foster faculty engagement around the Framework at their own institutions; and offer time for questions.

Participants will:

  • recognize the value of including faculty in discussions about using the Framework in information literacy instruction
  • identify strategies for leading faculty outreach regarding the Framework
  • build collaborative communities with faculty and other campus stakeholders around information literacy

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic

When to Plant Heirlooms and When to Plant Hybrids: Unearthing Instruction Librarians’ Motivations for Adopting New Practices
Elizabeth Galoozis (Information Literacy & Educational Technology Librarian) @ University of Southern California

"What motivates librarians to try new things in information literacy instruction? Why do some of us try everything new that comes along, while others stick to familiar methods (and some of us live in the middle)? In this session, I’ll present the preliminary results of a study that attempts to answer this question. The study involved 13 in-depth interviews with academic librarians at institutions in the Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA). Study participants were asked about a range of practices and habits, from using different kinds of examples in teaching to incorporating new theories into their instruction.

In a preliminary analysis of the results, motivations for seeking out and adopting new practices, as well as other influencing factors, have been identified. Factors such as the structure of an information literacy program, individual reflection practices, and institutional values emerged as themes. This presentation will focus on how these findings can be put into practice by participants, both as individual teachers and as coordinators or other kinds of influencers on others’ instructional practices. We will also discuss attitudes toward adopting new practices, the question of whether trying new things is inherently good, and how all of these interact in teaching communities of practice."

Participants will:

  • discuss common influences on and barriers to adopting new practices in information literacy instruction
  • develop strategies for encouraging the adoption of new practices in their libraries and for themselves

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

Winning Your Instructional Spurs: How Academic Librarians Transform from Information Experts to Expert Educators
Amanda Nichols Hess (eLearning, Instructional Technology, and Education Librarian) @ Oakland University

Do academic librarians transform from seeing themselves as information experts to postsecondary educators? If so, how does this change happen -- what facilitates it, and what does the process look like? In this presentation, I will share data collected from a broad survey of academic librarians whose work focuses on instruction on how -- and indeed whether -- they have developed perceptions of their roles as postsecondary educators. From these data in aggregate, I will propose key takeaways for our professional practices and learning offerings. The themes gleaned from these data can help individual academic librarians identify factors for developing their identities as educators, provide guidance to library administrators seeking to foster environments where librarians can hone their perspectives about teaching, and assist graduate faculty in designing library education where students must reflect on how being a postsecondary educator fits into their chosen career. In this presentation, I will include:

  • An introduction of the problem and the research questions;
  • A discussion of Jack Mezirow's transformative learning theory, and application of this theory to academic librarians’ teaching identity development;
  • Sharing of the data collection instrument, procedures, and analysis;
  • A presentation of aggregate data with emphasis on the important ideas and questions that emerge from the data;
  • A discussion of how we can apply these takeaways in a variety of instances and settings; and
  • Time for questions / discussion.

Participants will:

  • be able to summarize the results of a large-scale survey of academic librarians’ experiences with transformative learning theory and perspective transformation in relation to their identities as educators
  • be able to explain the key concepts of Jack Mezirow’s transformative learning theory
  • be able to identify how these survey results can be applied or considered in their own work as educators or in their own institution

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic

You Don’t Have to Cover Everything: Replacing the One-Shot with Competency-Based Library Instruction
Amanda Peach (Reference & Instruction Librarian) and Angel Rivera (Information Literacy Coordinator) @ Berea College

Fueled by our dislike of one-shot instruction sessions, but unwavering in our certainty that most first year students arrive on campus without the necessary information literacy skills, we have spent the last two years piloting an alternative program, which we refer to as the Competency-Based Library Instruction Program.

Relying on data gleaned from an information literacy skills survey administered to first year students prior to their arrival at Berea College, we crafted personalized recommendations for each and every student. Instead of attending a 50-minute one-shot with their composition classes as was the norm in the past, students received tailored invitations to attend either 0, 1, 2, or 3 workshops, based on their performance on the survey and the needs it identified.

The workshops were offered outside of classes, largely in the evenings and on the weekends, and were scheduled by the students themselves using our online scheduling software. Each 30 minute workshop addressed only one of the literacy skills areas at a time and participation in the workshops was voluntary, but highly encouraged. More than half of all first years participated in the program in their free time, despite it being voluntary, and we witnessed significant improvement in skill levels. The post-workshop survey showed student scores improve by an average of 22%. This presentation will discuss how we implemented the program, which resources were needed, and our successes and shortcomings.

Participants will:

  • compare the competency-based instruction program model to the one-shot, examining the strengths and weaknesses of each
  • identify key steps and resources required to implement a similar program
  • identify potential allies or partners on campus who would support such an endeavor

Intended audience: Brand new to the topic, At least some experience with the topic